aging


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Related to aging: Aging process

Aging

The process of investigating a company's accounts receivable according to how long individual invoices have been outstanding. Analysts can use aging to identify bad debt and/or problems with the company's credit policy.

aging

A technique for evaluating the composition of a firm's accounts receivables to determine whether irregularities exist. It is carried out by grouping a firm's accounts receivables according to the length of time accounts have been outstanding. For example, a financial analyst may use aging to determine whether a firm carries many overdue debtors that may never pay their bills.
References in periodicals archive ?
I think what we're going to show is there is an inextricable link between cancer and aging," Sharpless says.
Another salient theme discussed in the articles is whether aging can be viewed as a natural process.
Carl Barrett (now director of the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute) documented the first evidence that aging of cells in culture is an inherently genetically controlled process.
Delaware Association of Homes and Services for the Aging
In the aging population, 33 to 35 percent of suicides were facilitated by alcohol.
Although few chromosomal mutations have been associated with aging, many specific mitochondrial DNA mutations do accumulate in various tissues (e.
Howard Levinthal, PhD, of Rutgers University said, "There is, in fact, a psychology on top of the biology of aging that is just as complicated as the biology.
compounds after aging at 125 [degrees] C for 0, 70, 210, 280 and 500
When are they a sign or a result of accelerated aging caused by the spinal cord injury?
While disabling conditions appearing in young adults may be aggressively diagnosed and treated, the same conditions occurring in elderly persons may be attributed to the aging process alone, and not adequately diagnosed or treated (Becker & Kaufman, 1988; Carlson, 1988).
When the team examined muscle fibers for signs of aging, muscles that looked older or younger than average for the person's chronological age had corresponding changes in gene-expression levels.