agent

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Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

References in periodicals archive ?
In this section of the movie then, the representational or ideational meanings convey the agentive role of the lost thing and the collaborative actions of the boy and the lost thing in making the feeding of the lost thing possible, whereas in the book these representational meanings are confined to the boy's action in providing something for the lost thing to eat.
Jack's hope for narrative, however, is that it might play a more personally agentive function.
The lexical representation of 'goal' has an agentive quale role.
Within STS, objects of invention are not understood to simply be passive objects for use, but as agentive participants in (and influences on) the social world in which they function.
meeting as buyers and sellers', while Macpherson polemically disregards agentive selfhood in favour of a view derived from the legal doctrine of strict liability, which depicts 'the person as mass', people as 'things' and 'persons as matter in motion that causes bodily harm'.
In Australia, accounts of remote Indigenous youth culture in public or policy discourse tend not to portray their agentive participation in new forms of learning, multimodal practice and production or online communication.
Due in large part to agentive and resistant tactics on-reservation, and the reinvigoration and transformation of dance forms by young students returning from off-reservation boarding schools who brought with them new skills in language and music, Troutman shows how Indian dance complexes were forums in which hierarchies of class, race, and citizenship were challenged and contested.
This interrelationship of physical and sociocultural spaces also contextualises the conceptualisation of geographical space as comprising a combination of physical, semiotic and agentive aspects from a spatial point of view.
It is a means of linguistically re-engaging and re-envisioning the world and the ways in which we percieve God to be agentive within it.
The authors highlighted in this special issue, Activist Scholarship: Possibilities and Constraints of Participatory Action Research, discuss how collaborative relationships in learning engender autonomous, agentive processes that aim to secure greater equity and justice among the marginalized and often disenfranchised.
Friday manifests the anomalous terms of the agentive half-subject: he is mute but he does not disappear; he is indubitably Mudimbe's European idea of the African subject, but he acts out a political return of the repressed.
However, causes of mishaps that befall humanity in the African worldview is generally understood in terms of mystical powers as the agentive causes of such mishaps while Western understanding of causality seems to be inclined towards purely scientific or empirical explanations.