Across-the-Board

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Across-the-Board

Describing anything that applies to all affected parties equally. For example, if a company decides on an across-the-board pay reduction, all of its employees (including managers) have their pay reduced by the same percentage. Likewise, if an exchange is on an across-the-board upward trend, it means all or nearly all securities on that exchange are increasing in price.
References in classic literature ?
He had hid under the dead horse for a long time, peeping out furtively across the common.
Their posts beyond the mountains had to be supplied in yearly expeditions, like caravans, from Montreal, and the furs conveyed back in the same way, by long, precarious, and expensive routes, across the continent.
We must get somebody to go across whom he will really listen to.
The Tin Woodman began to use his axe at once, and, just as the two Kalidahs were nearly across, the tree fell with a crash into the gulf, carrying the ugly, snarling brutes with it, and both were dashed to pieces on the sharp rocks at the bottom.
I dared not follow across the stream, for he most surely would have seen me.
Of course it was impossible to drag our heavy elephant rifles and other kit with us across the desert, so, dismissing our bearers, we made an arrangement with an old native who had a kraal close by to take care of them till we returned.
The natives were not yet in sight, though he could plainly hear them approaching across the plantation.
At four o'clock he woke from sleep and saw the sunlight make a vivid angle across the red plush curtains and the grey tweed trousers.
The Arabs rushed across the room; the Waziri met them with their heavy spears.
The first sight that met his eyes set the red haze of hate and bloodlust across his vision, for there, crucified against the wall of the living-room, was Wasimbu, giant son of the faithful Muviro and for over a year the personal bodyguard of Lady Jane.
For this fell purpose he had backed the astounded De Vac twice around the hall when, with a clever feint, and backward step, the master of fence drew the King into the position he wanted him, and with the suddenness of lightning, a little twist of his foil sent Henry's weapon clanging across the floor of the armory.
A destroyer brought him across, and a Government motor-car was waiting at the quay to rush him up to the Front.