acre-foot


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acre-foot

A quantity of water,sand,or minerals equal to a volume 1 foot high over one hypothetical acre of land.It arises in the context of pricing water for irrigation purposes,estimating the value of minerals in place under the soil,and estimating numbers of fish per acre-foot of water.

References in periodicals archive ?
If the state and water agencies fail to finalize a California plan for the Colorado River, Metropolitan proposes to place into a Salton Sea escrow account $100 for every acre-foot of water made available to the district as a result of any effective determination of wasteful water practices in the Imperial Valley.
An acre-foot is about 325,800 gallons, or enough to supply a typical Antelope Valley household for a year.
An acre-foot is 325,851 gallons, or the volume of one acre flooded 12 inches deep.
The district's wholesale water rates are considered moderate, and the planned increases that will boost charges from $150 per acre-foot currently to $200 by fiscal 2009 are not expected to raise affordability concerns.
The lake typically holds up to 315,000 acre-feet of water; an acre-foot covers one acre, a foot deep.
Quantity-weighted average prices weight prices by how much quantity is sold at a certain price; this method is used for a more accurate assessment of average prices per acre-foot of water sold or leased.
In addition, in exchange for the Tribe's agreement not to oppose all permitting activities with respect to pumping and importation of groundwater in excess of 8,000 acre-feet per year up to 13,000 acre-feet per year, Fish Springs Ranch agrees that it shall pay the Tribe 12% of the gross sales price for each acre-foot of any additional water that Fish Springs Ranch ultimately sells in excess of 8,000 acre-feet per year.
What it comes down to is the cost per acre-foot of water generated," says Zammit.
Each acre-foot corresponds to 125,851 gallons, or the amount of water needed to cover an acre of ground to a height of 12 inches.
The result is that water costing the federal government upwards of $300 per acre-foot is pumped through open, unlined irrigation ditches, where much of it evaporates or seeps out because it is too cheap - to the farmer - to be worth the cost of protection.
An acre-foot of water is nearly 326,000 gallons, about the amount used by two typical Southland families in and around their homes in a year.
plans to transfer up to 1 million acre-foot of surplus water from the Colorado River Aqueduct via a 35-mile pipeline to spreading grounds in the Mojave Desert about 60 miles southwest of Needles, CA.