acknowledge


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acknowledge

To accept responsibility for something.In real estate,it means to sign an instrument in front of a notary public,who will certify that the signer stated the signature was an act of free will.

References in periodicals archive ?
Moore: We are asserting exactly the opposite, that the state must acknowledge God and that our freedoms flow from that God, the Judeo-Christian God.
It is this loyalty that has created the desire to acknowledge a partnership based on this commitment.
Failing to acknowledge that we are all racist, sexist, heterosexist and so on, simply because that was how we were socialized, also continues to diminish our ability to unlearn these isms.
Practitioners should incorporate in their engagement letters a statement that the auditor will not release the report until he or she receives the management representation letter in which management specifically acknowledges it is responsible for fairly presenting the financial statements and that it must affirm the truthfulness of the information it provides to the auditor.
We finally mastered the ways of business," they say, "and now you're pushing us to acknowledge ideas that the old-boy network calls flaky.
As I showed in my column, even some reviewers who absolve Solzhenitsyn of bigotry, such as Richard Pipes and John Klier, acknowledge this fact.
Gay or straight couples do not need the church to tell them they are blessed but many do want the church to acknowledge that their committed relationships are wholesome and that God's work of sanctification is enabled by that relationship.
The purpose of the awards ceremony was to acknowledge outstanding renovations to commercial buildings completed over the past five years.
The second significant flaw in Bader-Saye's argument concerns his claim to have overcome fully the church's doctrine of supersessionism, while offering a new way to acknowledge "witness of Israel post-Christum.
But the literary establishment--both white and black literary critics--has been loath to acknowledge or even recognize obvious signs of psychological import in black novels, largely in what appears to be an attempt to categorize (and easily relegate?
Yet he has become a powerful voice in this campaign precisely because he is at least willing to acknowledge a frightened and frustrated segment of working,class America that is left out of contemporary politics.
He concludes, unpersuasively in my view, that Seligman's defense of knowledge transcending class loyalties involved a class affiliation that he was loath to acknowledge.