Acculturation

(redirected from acculturative)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Acculturation

The adaptation of a product, strategy, or anything else to fit another culture. Acculturation is often necessary when a product enters a new market in another country (or even another region or population in the same country). For example, Coca-Cola uses slightly different recipes in some countries because each recipe fits cultural tastes better in each area. Acculturation may also be practical: some American car manufacturers had a difficult time selling automobiles in Japan when they first entered that market because their side mirrors were too large to navigate in Japanese traffic.
References in periodicals archive ?
The participants' experiences described in this study reveal an inside look at the retrospective accounts of Chinese immigrant adults who immigrated to Canada when they were children, and serve to highlight the complexities of the adjustment experience involved in the acculturative growth process.
The extent to which African American students are able to form a positive or negative racial identity is a significant predictor of reported levels of acculturative stress.
Acculturative Family Distancing (AFD) and Depression in Chinese American Families.
The present study approached hopelessness as a possible culturally specific response to a unique sociopolitical context in which acculturative stress can surface in relation to, as well as independent of, more traditional psychiatric diagnoses such as depression.
They often struggle with acculturative issues, including stress, confusion about cultural identity, intergenerational conflict, and discrimination (Anisef & Kilbride, 2003; Canadian Council on Social Development, 2000; Ma, 2002).
Once in the host country, the psychological trauma of uprooting and adapting to a new culture often becomes manifest as acculturative stress.
This anxiety, in turn, is associated with elevated acculturative stress, low self-esteem, ineffective social support, and lack of control over the migrant lifestyle.
It was found that adolescents' level of acculturation and acculturative stress did not appear to have a significant influence on their problem behaviors.
However, even with politically correct ancestry, the foreign-born and their native-born children cannot expect to be fully accepted as Canadians until their original and distinctive cultural differences have been reduced through thei r assimilative and acculturative experiences.
While acculturative stress can be thought of as an outcome of the acculturation process, it also has the potential to influence various development domains.
In contrast, ethnic identity conflict, stemming either from acculturative stress or from adolescents' perception of racial discrimination, has a negative effect on adolescents' psychological and behavioral adjustment.