abut

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Abut

To touch or to lie next to. The term is used in property to determine the obligations of a homeowner or the municipality.

abut

Next to, touching, contiguous. Typically arises in the context of whether property owners have a duty to clean snow, ice, and debris from

the sidewalks abutting their property.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, if during the course of an appraisal it becomes apparent that an abutter may be especially motivated to pay an above-market price for the subject, the appraiser's service to the client under the original scope is to alert the client to the situation and explain that measuring the value enhancement for abutters is not ordinarily undertaken.
The board also acknowledged receipt of correspondence from residents and abutters.
Abutters and others within a certain distance of the blasting sites would be notified and would have their properties examined to make sure they would not be affected.
Lodge, "the community meeting was a success as it allowed all abutters to be informed about the project and to provide valuable input.
Augustus had to be bonkers to think he could pull off this debacle without every one of those abutters calling their pricey law firm of This Is Mine, Esquire, which would have filed injunctions to keep the city in court well into the next millennium.
The project has been met with friction from abutters, who have raised concerns about the ongoing use of the road as well as potential impact to the neighborhood if the development is put in.
Originally, the plan also contained a gas station, but it was removed in deference to abutters concerns about the environmental impact.
At the prior session, during the public comment portion of the meeting, local businessman Russ Dumais stood up with some abutters, requesting that the board do just that, denying a zoning change for a single entity, according to the Laconia Citizen.
Twenty-three of the 24 abutters donated easements without compensation, with the lone holdout being Raymond L.