zero

(redirected from absolute zero)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Zero-Coupon Bond

A bond that pays no interest. It is sold at a discount from par and matures at par. These are fairly illiquid investments because they do not benefit from changes in interest rates. However, they tend to be low-risk. Zero-coupon bonds fluctuate in price, sometimes dramatically, with changes in interest rates. Sometimes zero-coupon bonds are issued as such; other times they are bonds stripped of their coupons by a financial institution and resold as zero-coupon bonds. A zero-coupon bond is less formally known as a zero.

zero

References in periodicals archive ?
But in a vacuum - if densities are low enough to avoid condensation and if temperatures can be lowered to near absolute zero - free atoms can be slowed down to speeds of less than one mile per hour, allowing a close examination of their nature and properties.
It is an honor to receive Delphi's Absolute Zero Defect Award," said Dan Artusi, president and chief operating officer of Silicon Laboratories.
This is why the detectors must be cooled to temperatures close to absolute zero (-273.
It was of great value to me - but of absolute zero value to anyone else.
I think I have seen absolute zero evidence that this will happen.
They supercooled atoms of the element rubidium to the coldest temperature ever--nearly -273 [degrees] C (-460 [degrees] F), also known as absolute zero (see "thermometer," left).
Nasdaq:CRUS) has received the Delphi Delco Electronic Systems Absolute Zero Defect Award, given annually to suppliers that demonstrate the highest ability to provide products with no defects and that conform to Delphi's stringent specifications for quality and performance.
The third law of thermodynamics prohibits scientists from reaching absolute zero, but that doesn't stop the competitive among them from trying to get as close as possible.
Many materials become superconductors at temperatures approaching absolute zero, capable of carrying vast amounts of electrical current with no resistance.
That is because an atom laser can exist only in an extremely low vacuum at temperatures close to absolute zero, where atoms slow down and assume the form of an entirely new category of matter.
Instead of lining up neatly (as in magnets and in an antiferromagnet, left, seen in superconductors), the spins move around uncomfortably thanks to quantum fluctuations that keep them twitching even at absolute zero.
However, the Mirror mathematician says for a temperature to drop by 100 per cent it would have to go down to absolute zero, which is -275.