T

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Related to absolute temperature: Absolute temperature scale

T

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol indicating that the stock has warrants or rights.

T

A symbol appearing next to a stock listed on NASDAQ indicating that the stock is not common issue, but has a warrant attached to it. All NASDAQ listings use a four letter abbreviation; if a T follows the abbreviation, this indicates that the security being traded has a warrant attached.

t

1. Used in the dividend column of stock transaction tables in newspapers to indicate the market value as of the distribution date of stock dividends paid during the preceding 12 months. Stocks with this listing paid no cash dividends: Jetron .71t.
2. Used in bond transaction tables in newspapers to indicate a floating-rate bond or note: Amoco 8.05s89t.
References in periodicals archive ?
The paper also describes tests of the suitability of aluminum- and polysilicon-based Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) to measure the temperature of the silicon-substrate, which is required to convert a temperature difference determined with an integrated thermocouple or from the thermal resistance of the microhotplate into the absolute temperature of the microhotplate.
The volume occupied by a gas at constant pressure is directly proportional to its absolute temperature (Charles's law)
Name Symbol Absolute temperature T Absolute temperature, fluid [T.
Not until the mid-19th century, when British physicist Lord Kelvin invented the absolute temperature scale, could scientists speak accurately about how much hotter one object was than another.
An absolute temperature between 20[degrees]C/68[degrees]F and of 25[degrees]C/77 [degrees]F.
Braking feature allows binding material to tread absolute temperature of 370--415 [degrees]C without the appearance of defects on the tread.
The derivations of the signs of the fundamental quantities namely, mass, electric charge and absolute temperature in the negative universe shall be done below.
Rubber elasticity (or entropy elasticity as termed in kinetic theory of rubber) is proportional to absolute temperature in a certain temperature range.
As a first approximate law, that of Boyle-Gay-Lussac {sic} may be considered, according to which the product of volume and pressure of a gas is proportional to the absolute temperature.
where [Rho] is the melt density, T is the absolute temperature, and Gn is the plateau modulus estimated from a master curve.
Rather than measuring the absolute temperature of a resin mixture, the system profiles the rate of temperature change in the resin/catalyst mixing vessel to detect an out-of-control reaction before it can cause damage.