Zionism

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Zionism

The political view that Jews have a right to national homeland in Palestine roughly corresponding to the borders of Biblical Israel. Zionism emerged as a nationalist movement in 19th-century Europe as secular and assimilated Jews did not find wide acceptance in European society. Many, though not all, early Zionists were socialists; this led to the establishment of communal farms in Palestine. Religious Zionism was initially a minor part of the movement, but has grown in importance since the 1960s. After the establishment of the States of Israel in 1948, the Zionist movement has concentrated on maintaining or expanding Israel's borders and/or influence. Proponents of Zionism believe a Jewish homeland is the only place Jews can be perfectly safe from persecution, while critics contend that Palestinian Arabs have been displaced and discriminated against since the early 20th century.
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When Brandeis finally did assume leadership of the then moribund American Zionist movement, its leaders were amazed to find in Brandeis not an idealistic figurehead but a pragmatist who immersed himself in the minutiae of its operations.
This explains the otherwise curious fact: The Zionist movement has never given a clear answer to its most basic question: How to create a Jewish state in a country inhabited by another people.
The question hovering over the work is what exactly was the influence of so-called Christian Zionism on the development of the Zionist movement.
The reason is simple: From its inception, the Zionist movement set out to turn a country where the vast majority of people were not Jewish into a country that gives special rights and privileges to Jews at the expense of non-Jews.
Starting with the emergence of the Zionist movement in the 19th century and the figures who shaped it, the publication goes on to cover the founding of Israel and its subsequent history, up to and including the 'Road Map for Peace', the construction of the Wall, the death of Ararat and the withdrawal from Gaza.
Since the inception of the Zionist movement its leaders have been repeatedly confronted with the unavoidable "Arab problem", not least because the indigenous population has been able to resist.
Land is considered central to the conflict between Palestinians and the Zionist movement.
Moshe was considered by all who knew him as a Progressive Zionist leader who greatly loved Israel and spent many years dedicated to the Zionist movement.
This works in Israel's favour and to the detriment of the anti Zionist movement as a whole.
He was told that it was important to try to get Palestine added to the British area of influence and to recognize the importance of not prejudicing the Zionist movement and the possibility of its development under British auspices.
It provides an annotated list of 690 legal and political documents from the beginnings of the Zionist movement to the May 2004 meeting of the League of Arab States.
In the meantime, the massacres against unarmed Palestinians continued under the policy of ethnic cleansing which was adopted by the global Zionist movement since the beginning of its occupation of Palestine.