Zionism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Zionism

The political view that Jews have a right to national homeland in Palestine roughly corresponding to the borders of Biblical Israel. Zionism emerged as a nationalist movement in 19th-century Europe as secular and assimilated Jews did not find wide acceptance in European society. Many, though not all, early Zionists were socialists; this led to the establishment of communal farms in Palestine. Religious Zionism was initially a minor part of the movement, but has grown in importance since the 1960s. After the establishment of the States of Israel in 1948, the Zionist movement has concentrated on maintaining or expanding Israel's borders and/or influence. Proponents of Zionism believe a Jewish homeland is the only place Jews can be perfectly safe from persecution, while critics contend that Palestinian Arabs have been displaced and discriminated against since the early 20th century.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The challenge before Christian Zionism is to consider the complexities of the context in Israel/Palestine.
However, following the Holocaust and the creation of the State of Israel, Jewish opposition to Zionism largely vanished.
Questioning the Zionist philosophy of history and Zionist discourse on Palestine, Palestinian history, and Jewish exile, Elmessiri asserts that his conclusion is true about Zionism as well.
Jews, argues Ochs, "cannot be encouraged by Yoder's failure to think of the question of Israel beyond the stark either/or that stands between 'anti-Zionism' and the particular Zionism of Israel's right-wing nationalists.
At the beginning of the new millennium, Zionism appears not only to have fulfilled itself but to have become outmoded.
If one explores the viewpoints of Jews uncomfortable with Israeli policy, the Christian far right's simultaneous anti-Semitic and pro-Israel position, and the early Zionist leaders' changing positions on Zionism, the Palestinians and British colonialism, one sees a much more fractured narrative about Israel that could allow some humanity to Palestinians and a better understanding about the racialization of Arabs, Muslims and Jews alike.
Prior points out that virtually the entire religious leadership of Jews in Eastern Europe in the 19th century considered Theodor Herzl and his creed, Zionism, to be anathema--a pseudo-messianic, satanic conspiracy against God.
Sabeel identified Christian Zionism as a demon within the ranks of Western Christianity that silently but actively legitimizes Israel's violent policies toward Palestinians.
EVEN WHEN Zionism and Arab nationalism each first awoke at the close of the nineteenth century, they seemed destined to clash.
Bush and his toady Blair are being manipulated by international Zionism.
A Postzionist position, as Silberstein makes clear, is a critique reached through, and only thereafter, beyond Zionism.
There is fundamental information about the Jews in general, anti-semitism, the Jewish Enlightenment (Haskalah), Zionism, the depiction of Jews as having "female" characteristics, and the professionalization and medicalization of antisemitism.