Zimbabwean Dollar


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Zimbabwean Dollar

The former currency of Zimbabwe. It replaced the Rhodesian dollar following (official) independence from Britain in 1980 and was used until extreme hyperinflation forced a change to a new currency code in early 2009 and was abandoned in April of that year. Its inflation rate in December 2008 was 6.5 x 10^108%.
References in periodicals archive ?
The opposition Movement for Democratic Change condemned the arrests, saying the protests were justified by the daily cash withdrawal limit of 500,000 Zimbabwean dollars (less than one US dollar).
Thus falling prices of base metals, oil, gold and non-oil commodities have hurt currencies as diverse as the Russian rouble, Venezuela bolivar, Australian dollar, Norwegian kroner, South African rand and Zimbabwean dollar.
But the Zimbabwean dollar continued to weaken, and farmers responded by shoring up their profits through paring down on permanent employment and employing more female piece workers.
Bitify is proud to have hosted several charity auctions, from the Ten Trillion Zimbabwean dollar bill signed by Bitcoin guru Andreas Antonopoulos, to the very recent Direct Relief fund raising campaign in partnership with SatoshiLabs.
The southern African country started using foreign currencies including the US dollar and South African rand in 2009 after the Zimbabwean dollar was ruined by hyperinflation, which hit 500bn per cent in 2008.
Before the Zimbabwean dollar collapsed under record 231 million percent inflation in 2008, cinemas were common in cities and towns.
Some activities were not carried out due to the hyperinflation of Zimbabwean dollar in 2008.
Agyemang doggedly trailed Mugabe through the time of sanctions, an election, hyperinflation and the replacement of the Zimbabwean dollar with a basket of currencies, food shortages and both media and economic wars.
The Zimbabwean dollar was attacked, international credit dried up, shop shelves were empty, many factories closed down, and plans were hatched by Tony Blair's UK government to invade Zimbabwe.
This culminated in the crash of the Zimbabwe dollar on November 14, 1997, a day referred to as "Black Friday" by Zimbabweans, when the Zimbabwean dollar lost 75 percent of its value against the US dollar (Raftopoulos, 2009).
The economy effectively completely collapsed in 2008 when hyperinflation escalated to the point where the Zimbabwean dollar was trading with the US dollar at an exchange rate of 10 trillion to 1.
And yet he took the time to check where I was staying, to pass on some potentially crucial safety tips and ensure I could get my hands on enough cash (the Zimbabwean dollar was so worthless you needed a suitcase of the stuff to buy a beer).