Z score

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Related to Z-Scores: standard deviation, Standardized score

Z score

Statistical measure that quantifies the distance (measured in standard deviations) a data point is from the mean of a data set. Separately, Z score is the output from a credit-strength test that gauges the likelihood of bankruptcy.

Z Score

In statistics, the number of standard deviations a data point is from the mean value. Measuring the Z-score of a company is used to help determine a company's likelihood of bankruptcy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most boys had BMI and height z-scores within 1 SD of the WHO mean (Table 1).
Differences between groups on the z-scores were analyzed in two separate ANOVA models.
The final data were compiled, de-identified and anthropometric indices of 'weight- and height-for-age' z-scores were calculated for each village with the WHO program "Anthro plus" using 2007 reference values for 5-19 year old subjects [22].
Following the WHO recommendations, for WAZ analysis, children with -6 to 5 z-scores are included.
Z-scores, calculated from the inverse normal function, are provided to facilitate meta-analytic comparisons.
Since z-scores are independent of the unit of the raw scores and values from which they have been derived, direct comparisons of each variable with others become possible.
Humes, MD, "A Regression equations for calculation of Z-scores of cardiac structures in a large cohort of healthy infants, children, and adolescents: an echocardiographic study.
8), and (in separate models) waist circumference z-scores at ages 5 and 7 years (n = 224); standard errors and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by using a robust (Huber-White) variance estimate.
The means for BMI-for-age, height-for-age and weight-for-age z-scores for the study group were -0.
Texert's RiskPredictor provides: -- Comprehensive risk forecasting and predictive capabilities, -- Accurate pinpoint of risk anomalies using small data sets (as few as 5 to 8), -- Clearer interpretation of anomalies through advanced implementation of Z-scores, -- Patented algorithms to identify hidden patterns within anomalies, and -- Solutions to communication failures for complex and hidden risk.
These included color printouts of bone density levels, graphic images of the hip, spine and total body, t-score and z-scores, and graphs displaying their readings along with future projections based on normal rates of loss.