Yield ratio

Yield ratio

The quotient of two bond yields.

Yield Ratio

A comparison of the expected yield of one bond to the expected yield of another. A yield ratio is important when deciding whether to invest in one bond or another; generally, the one with the higher yield wins out. However, it is important to take into account the after tax basis when taking the yield ratio of a corporate bond and a tax-exempt municipal bond. A corporate bond yields less than its stated interest rate because of taxation, whereas a tax-exempt municipal bond does not. Thus, a municipal bond paying a lower interest rate will often net the bondholder more than a corporate bond with a slightly higher interest rate, depending upon one's tax bracket.
References in periodicals archive ?
This performance can be accomplished provided the width-to-thickness ratio is 7, the weld-to-plate yield ratio is 0.
It had two 200MW units, with a yield ratio of 34-37%.
The authors of the research consider two dependent variables: the dividend payout ratio, which provides with the view on the capital management policy, and the dividend yield ratio, which demonstrates shareholders' dividend preferences.
5% last year, though it was supplemented by a 7%+ dividend yield ratio.
The other related feature is the drop in the bond-equity earnings yield ratio to a series low, itself an outcome reflecting in large measure the convergence of yields in bond markets to Japanese levels.
These advantages, coupled with automated wafer alignment, enable room-temperature bonding to achieve significantly shorter production time and a higher yield ratio, thus realizing reductions in device production costs.
For each of 293 comparisons of organic or semi-organic production to locally prevalent methods under field conditions, the yield ratio is the ratio of organic: non-organic production.
The first was conservative in the sense that it applied the yield ratio for the developed world to the entire planet, i.
Emergy yield ratio (row 3) shows how many times more real wealth goes to the economy than received back.
In this context, one would pick an expected yield ratio by looking at the earnings-to-price ratio of similar but publicly traded firms, an approach borrowed from relative valuation.