Point

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Related to Yield Point: plastic viscosity

Point

The smallest unit of price change quoted, or one one-hundredth of a percent. Related: Minimum price fluctuation and tick.

Point

A way of conceptualizing price changes in the trading of securities. For stocks, a point corresponds to $1, while for bonds it indicates a 1% change relative to the face value. For example, if one states that GE rose two points on Thursday, this means that it rose $2. See also: Tick.

point

A change in the value of a security or a security index or average. For common and preferred stocks a point represents a change of $1. For bonds a point represents a 1% change in face value. For example, a one-point decline in a $1,000 principal amount bond translates to a $10 decline in price. For stock averages and indexes a point represents a unit of movement and is best interpreted as a percent of the beginning value. For example, a 100-point decline in the Dow Jones Industrial Average that started the day at 10,000 represents a 1% fall in the average.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the specimens having maxima at the yield point, no resulting significant difference in tensile strength (p = 0.
A more detailed analysis of the estimated parameters A, B and C revealed that for each egg sac two clusters or populations of fibers could be found, mostly differing in the stress level of the region beyond the yield point.
3 shows comparison of relaxed stress values obtained in tests performed before and beyond the yield point.
Experimental results pertaining to yield point and ultimate point are presented in Tables 3 and 4 respectively.
The yield point at 23[degrees]C (73[degrees]F) is found to be about:
The lack of a distinct yield point is due to the surface restraint, Poisson's effect, and the shape of the specimen, which create a multiaxial stress situation.
Note that the yield point is a well-defined displacement in the curve.
Figure 5 shows stress-strain curves of the synthesized polyurethanes and results concerning the ultimate tensile strength, yield point, percentage elongation at break, modulus of elasticity and shore D hardness obtained for the different samples at room temperature are summarized in Table 4.
5% strain and further increases in stress produce a continued decrease in this slope as the curve approaches the yield point.
RHEO-CLAY: provides a high-inverted yield point (YP)--plastic viscosity (PV) ratio for improved rate of penetration, optimum hole cleaning, and greater liquid/solids separation efficiency from hydrocylones - differs from sodium bentonite (montmorillonite) by having lower cation exchange capacity and greater yield in the presence of high hardness (Ca++/Mg++) and sodium (Na+) values.
This is the reason why a new method has been developed to determine deformation resistance, yield point, tensile strength, ductility and contraction of high-strength steels during rapid heating.