Point

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Related to Yield Point: plastic viscosity

Point

The smallest unit of price change quoted, or one one-hundredth of a percent. Related: Minimum price fluctuation and tick.

Point

A way of conceptualizing price changes in the trading of securities. For stocks, a point corresponds to $1, while for bonds it indicates a 1% change relative to the face value. For example, if one states that GE rose two points on Thursday, this means that it rose $2. See also: Tick.

point

A change in the value of a security or a security index or average. For common and preferred stocks a point represents a change of $1. For bonds a point represents a 1% change in face value. For example, a one-point decline in a $1,000 principal amount bond translates to a $10 decline in price. For stock averages and indexes a point represents a unit of movement and is best interpreted as a percent of the beginning value. For example, a 100-point decline in the Dow Jones Industrial Average that started the day at 10,000 represents a 1% fall in the average.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is expected, therefore, that an evolution of an yield point in epoxy glass aged under a postyield strain is different from that of epoxy glass aged under preyield strains.
The viscosity in Herschel-Bulkley is approximated as a constant value before the yield point (while the actual viscosity is much lower), and its slope is discontinuous.
The increased time of zero-order approach may be due to the near zero slope of the stress-strain curve near the Yield point.
Stress-strain curves for Thermolyn Rigid and Orfitrans Stiff exhibited maxima at the break point, comparatively low stress at the yield point, and a relatively long strain elongation period before breaking.
Experimental results pertaining to yield point and ultimate point are presented in Tables 3 and 4 respectively.
iii) During Luders-band propagation (lower yield point) the AE level (energy) is lower than that at the upper yield point.
Low ductility or brittle materials may not necessarily have well defined yield points, but do exhibit definite failure points, since they fail in compression by a shattering type of fracture.
The yield point at 23[degrees]C (73[degrees]F) is found to be about:
Each yield point would be divided by the area it represents and then multiplied by the price of the crop.
the tangent modulus at the yield point, seem to be quite equal for both fiber populations.
Cosat explains the spring has passed its "first yield point," the point at which it will not return to its original length.