Working Time Regulation


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Working Time Regulation

a directive issued by the EUROPEAN UNION (EU) in 1998, recommending that employees should work no more than a maximum of 48 hours in any one week. The directive is part of the EU's SOCIAL CHAPTER programme aimed at protecting employees’ rights and improving the quality of working conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Thornley said: "We are not reassured by government reports that the NHS is 97% compliant with the new working time regulation as we fear many junior doctors are being pressured to lie about hours.
It increases the complexity and cost of the payroll administration unnecessarily, and is further gold-plating of the preferable Working Time Regulation approach to holiday pay.
Contract notice: Evaluation of offshore working time regulation.
Under the Working Time Regulation Act 1998, all employees who work at least three hours at night should be assessed for their suitability to work at these times.
Unfortunately, if you are entitled to spend the time on-call at home, this will not count as working time for the purpose of calculating your hours under the Working Time Regulation or in terms of the national minimum wage.
The Working Time Regulation stipulates a worker must have at least a 20 minute break away from work in a six-hour period.
Employers are obliged (under the Working Time Regulations 1998) to give workers at least 5.
The Contractor confirms by submitting his offer that the execution of the services corresponds to the German accident prevention, occupational safety and working time regulations as well as the German and EU-wide generally accepted safety and working medical rules.
Michael Hibbs, chairman of the employment law committee at Birmingham Law Society said: "Employers are not required to give 'smoking breaks' on top of the usual breaks required under the Working Time Regulations 1998.
The Working Time Regulations (WTR), the UK version of the European Working Time Directive, have applied to all junior doctors since 2004.
A RECENT European Court of Justice (ECJ) decision, which ruled that a Spanish security alarm company breached working time regulations, could have a big impact on Scottish businesses.
The European Court of Justice reviewed the legislation on working time which, in the UK, is the Working Time Regulations 1998.