Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004


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Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004

Legislation in the United States that extended tax cuts to middle class families and restored business tax cuts that were scheduled to expire. Among other provisions, it extended the $1,000 child tax credit, which was set to change to $700 per child.
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18) NAEA Letter to Commissioner Everson regarding Section 152 of the Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 (2/6/06), available at naea.
The estimated cost of the Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 is $146 billion.
Several expiring tax provisions affecting individuals and businesses were extended when the Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 was signed into law by President Bush in Oct.
In Tax Advisor, the profession's tax guru, Sidney Kess, gives an overview of the Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004.
The Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004, signed by President Bush on October 4, extends the provisions for the Work Opportunity Tax Credit and the Welfare to Work Tax Credit available to employers through December 31, 2005.
A number of provisions in the Military Family Tax Relief Act of 2003 (MFTRA) (1) and the Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 (WFTKA) (2) grant tax relief to military personnel and their families.
President Bush signed the Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 yesterday in Des Moines, Iowa, which includes the extension.
Generally, the Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 (WFTRA) affects individuals by accelerating the effective dates of prior legislative changes, creating a uniform definition of a "child" and temporarily extending alternative minimum tax relief.
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