Workfare


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Workfare

A somewhat informal term for government benefits or other aid given in exchange for state-sponsored work. Workfare labor may or may not be compensated, but, if it is, the government is responsible for payment. Workfare contrasts with welfare, in which recipients have few requirements beyond low income.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other organisations such as some local charities would be best committing to avoiding using Workfare, and follow Caerphilly's excellent example.
Claimants are twice as likely to be sanctioned on a workfare scheme than get a job at the end and some companies managing the placements, appallingly, refer 45% of people on them for sanctions.
This paper argues that despite the absence of the term 'paternalism' in relevant government discourse, paternalism is nonetheless a substantial characteristic of workfare policy.
But that goes down well with his audience who see it more as Work-Fair than Workfare.
He wrote: "Unite was more than disappointed with the decision taken by the Labour front bench to abstain, failing to oppose the government's attempts to shore up its failing workfare scheme.
In the first part, they explains what surplus people are, how money is made off the creation of surplus populations, how capitalism has created surplus people from its beginning, how industrial countries manage their surplus populations with workhouses and workfare, and a whirl-wind history of 20th-century American economic and social policies.
Marx's ambitions in Capital, it will be argued, continue to meet Therborn's challenge even in the historically distant field of Australian workfare, where, it is suggested, the extant literature reflects certain theoretical limitations.
Social Protection in the form of conditional cash transfers, non-contributory social pension schemes or targeted workfare programs, have evolved in recent years in an increasing number of developing countries.
The outcry surrounding the government's Workfare scheme, under which young unemployed people work up to eight weeks unpaid while keeping their benefits, shows the difficulty in addressing unemployment and welfare.
Former Marks and Spencer chief Sir Stuart Rose is among those who is backing the workfare scheme.
Thousands of long-term unemployed are currently being appointed as safety and security guards in German cities under the guidance of nonprofits through work (re)integration measures based on workfare (Eick, 2011a).
WASHINGTON -- Workfare recipients could receive benefits long enough to earn an associate degree under proposed legislation.

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