work

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Work

1. To perform a task, especially in exchange for compensation or the potential for profit. Working is necessary for any economy to function.

2. See: Job.

work

see JOB, LABOUR, WORK ORGANIZATION, SOCIOLOGY OF WORK, HOMEWORKING, DOMESTIC LABOUR.

work

see JOB.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, the tidal volume decreases, hypercarbia develops, and the patient's work of breathing increases.
The possible mechanical advantages of tracheostomy over ETT intubation are believed to be secondary to changes in respiratory dynamics, such as decreased dead space, airway resistance and, thus, a decrease in work of breathing.
A reduction of the work of breathing and the assurance of patient comfort and synchrony with the ventilator.
Work of breathing: Two studies involving 31 participants with chronic respiratory disease reported the impact of breathing control on the work of breathing measured in joules per litre (McKinley et al 1961, Vitacca et al 1998).
The dosages of opioids needed to relieve the sense of the work of breathing are low, between 2.
If the work of breathing is increased by pulmonary complications, there is no reserve for normal activities of daily living (ADLs).
The ventilator also features a quick and reactive flow trigger for patient comfort, minimizing the work of breathing, with the added benefit of the patient being able to set PEEP (positive end expiratory pressure).
Salma Shaikh informed that in winter season, pneumonia could cause infection of small air sacs of the lungs and surrounding tissues, which could develop inflammation and deterioration of lung function and the lungs become unable to easily transfer oxygen to the blood and ensuring smooth work of breathing, she added.
In hospital, the main goals are to reduce the work of breathing and tachypnea and increase oxygen saturation in the blood.
Ventilators can help reduce the work of breathing by unloading the ancillary respiratory muscles, but they are often bulky and heavy, creating additional limitations for users.
If the calculated number is greater than 104 the patient, again in all probability, will not be capable of performing the work of breathing when extubated.
1) (42 [26] [19 to 32]), work of breathing as measured in joules/litre or mixed venous oxygenation (59 [36] [29 to 43]), maximal inspiratory pressure ([PI.