Weapon of Mass Destruction

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Weapon of Mass Destruction

Any weapon designed to kill human beings in exceptionally large numbers. Examples include biological, chemical and nuclear weapons. International agreements limit the spread of these weapons and they are rarely used in practice. However, they remain a significant political risk in some parts of the world.
References in periodicals archive ?
Matt describes his first meeting with Monty, when he asked what it was really like on the WMD trail.
The analytical point of disaggregating the WMD threat is to allow the United States to set clear national counterproliferation priorities for the homeland as well as our military forces and decide what constitutes acceptable risk.
DTRA provides capabilities to reduce, eliminate, and counter the WMD threat, and mitigate its effects.
Who gives us the moral right to prevent Iran and North Korea from having the same WMDs that we have and that we have used?
The Superseding Indictment alleges that BUNCHAN, TAN, ROCHON and others acting in concert with and at the direction of BUNCHAN and TAN, fraudulently solicited and obtained investments in WMDS and 1UOL and then intentionally misappropriated the investors' funds for their own personal use.
In testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Rumsfeld acknowledged the possibility that WMDs did not exist at the start of the war.
David Kay was expected to tell US congressmen and women at private hearings that Saddam may have pretended that he had distributed WMDs to his most loyal commanders in a bid to deter an invasion, it was reported.
Now that the scavenger hunt for imminent WMDs and nukes is stretching into its fifth month, some state citizens feel we should find out if the Bush Administration lied with its claims about WMDs; if our elected officials were poorly served by U.
First Responders Guide to Weapons of Mass Destruction is a pocket-sized reference for first responders who may be called to a site where WMDs have been employed.
In the view of the Bush administration WMDs meant, in short, that relations between nations would no longer be structured around the mutual recognition of sovereignty.
In September, Iran's Residing Representative at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Reza Najafi reiterated the necessity for the immediate dismantlement of all kinds of the WMDs in the region, specially the Zionist regime's chemical and nuclear arsenals.