With-Profits Bond

With-Profits Bond

A fixed income investment based on non-fixed income instruments. For example, one may purchase a with-profits bond with a 5% annual return, but the money one invests is placed in stocks, mutual funds and other instruments. The profits made in the "good years" are not disbursed to the investor; rather, they are used to make up for losses in the "bad years." These instruments are designed to allow one to take advantage of market movements without assuming too much risk. With-profits bonds are sponsored by insurance companies.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Au10,000 with-profits bond purchased 10 years ago is now worth Au17,248, giving customers an impressive annual return of 5.
If it goes into a savings account paying a miserly rate of interest, the with-profits bond might look comparatively generous
For tax efficiency, the best way to extract money from a with-profits bond over a period is to take 5% per year.
Under the move, someone with a typical with-profits bond into which they paid pounds 30,000 in 2001 will receive a total special bonus of pounds 4500.
The surrender value is the value that you would have received that day if you had encashed it so will include any early exit penalties, and if it's a with-profits bond, any market value reduction and terminal bonus.
Over the last few years the stock market has recovered impressively but many investors have asked why their With-Profits Bond hasn't kept pace with this recovery.
It said a PS10,000 with-profits bond purchased 10 years ago is now worth PS17,082, while the same amount of money invested in a typical savings account would have grown to PS12,228.
As many as 200,000 with-profits bond holders could get the chance to scrap their policies in 2011, without penalty; * One option on poorly-performing policies may be to leave it paid up.
Q: On the advice of HSBC Bank, I invested pounds 40,000 in a with-profits bond with Legal & General.
I HAVE a with-profits bond in which I invested Pounds 10,000 three years ago.
Precious little in the piggy: Many with-profits bond investors face grim reading in annual reports now being issued