Wipe


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Wipe

In film, a transition between two shots or scenes in which a second shot gradually replaces a first. Wipes are done in editing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of course, baby wipes have always, and still do, dominate the personal care space.
In fact, it is the 93% of wipes tonnage that is not marketed as flushable that INDA president Dave Rousse is most concerned about.
With so-called "flushable" but not dispersible wipes clogging city sewer systems and concerns about chemical formulations growing, the disposable wet wipes sector has confronted its share of controversies.
After testing seven types of wipes used in hospitals, they found the effi-ciency of the wipes at removing traces of MRSA bacteria, Clostridium diffi-cile (a bacterial infection that affects the digestive system) and Acinetobacter from surfaces was not up to scratch, and in some cases even spread the bacteria.
com now offers a range of polyester wipes that are of optimal strength and durability with low particle and fibre generation.
Contec says that this means that the user gets the fast and efficient pick-up and retention of particles for which microfibre is known without the cost of a full microfibre wipe.
They're called Break Free wipes and are available on-line.
Take a few minutes to wipe down door handles, steering wheel and transmission handle.
Many supermarkets that are incorporating SaniCart Wipe into their stores have requested ad slicks to promote this new product in their ads and flyers.
We thought it was a very good idea,'' says Robert Stiles, president of Gelson's Markets, adding that the company offers wipes - each sheet costs about 2 cents - purchased from a medical supply company to assure that none of the disinfectants in them will harm a customer.
The frog wipes these waxes over every part of its body, and when the lipids dry, the frog looks like it's made of plastic.
EPA recently issued a proposed rule to modify its hazardous waste management regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) for certain solvent-contaminated materials, such as reusable shop towels, rags, disposable wipes and paper towels.