Window

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Window

A brokerage firm's cashier department, where delivery of securities and settlement of transactions take place.

Window

1. A physical place at a bank or brokerage where a customer goes to receive services. For example, a client may approach a window at a bank to deposit a check or make a withdrawal. Likewise, a client goes to a window at a brokerage to settle an account or deliver and receive securities.

2. A time during which it would be advantageous to conduct a certain transaction. For example, an investor has a window in which to make a profit on a security by buying while the price tends to rise and selling when it tends to fall.

window

A period of time during which an action can be expected to generate a successful result. For example, underwriters may have a window for corporate debt issues sandwiched between two periods of heavy U.S. Treasury offerings.
References in classic literature ?
Mary asked, deepening the two lines between her eyes, and hoisting herself nearer to Katharine upon the window-sill.
All of which the gutter-cat did, despite the positive evidence of her senses that this human noise had proceeded from the white bird itself on the window-sill.
Then he leapt on my father, who was clinging in terror to the window-sill, and, grappling, tried to strangle him with the rope, which he threw over his head, but which slipped over his struggling shoulders to his feet.
The robin-redbreasts in the shrubbery outside must have had prodigious balances at their bankers; they hopped up on the window-sill so fearlessly; they looked in with so little respect at the two rich men.
She leaned over the window-sill and looked down at the hurrying and bustle below.
When they had got through such studies as they had in hand, they stood leaning on the window-sill, and looking down upon the patch of garden.
I remained leaning on the window-sill for nearly a quarter of an hour, looking out absently into the black darkness, and hearing nothing, except now and then the voices of the servants, or the distant sound of a closing door, in the lower part of the house.
When this crisis had arrived, Miss Miggs, affecting to be exhausted with terror, and to cling to the window-sill for support, put out her nightcap, and demanded in a faint voice who was there.