Window Tax


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Related to Window Tax: Hearth Tax

Window Tax

A tax on the number of windows on a house. Window taxes existed in Britain and France during the 18th and 19th centuries. They were intended primarily to affect the wealthy, who tended to live in houses with more windows. In England, the tax was structured as a flat rate per window, with a variable rate applying after 10 windows. Because of the window tax, some homes had bricked up spaces for windows so owners easily could install windows if the tax were reduced or repealed.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this context, no government has ever introduced facilities of the one window tax collection for the industrial community of the country.
The levy system has not failed as such, but it is in the process of being bypassed by progress and transformed into a piece of fiscal history, alongside Pitt's Window Tax.
YES, the window tax lasted from 1697 to 1851 and applied to houses with more than six windows.
Perhaps people affected by this ridiculous tax should resort to the tactics of those who had the window tax imposed hundreds of years ago - they simply boarded them up.
HAS anybody ever heard of the Window Tax - the answer would probably be no but if you relate to your school days, the answer would probably be "yes".
What will come next, a window tax on all private homes like that imposed in the 18th and 19th centurie - the results of which can still be seen in the bricked-up windows of listed buildings.
Cameron's folly will surely go down in history as a crime against the poor, more damaging than the Georgian window tax.
If it's applied fairly this modern-day equivalent of the Window Tax will avail us nothing but more bureaucracy.
They were filled in 300 years ago to avoid a window tax on glass, a tax so hated it gave the language the phrase "daylight robbery".
So yes, nature does change the planet and humans have only a small effect-yes we do need to be more environmental in our actions - but climate change is just another tax-just like the window tax of years ago.
WHEN the English monarch, he Dutch aristocrat William the Third, was short of money he attempted to find a soluion with the imposition of the much-hated Window Tax, which led to: "Daylight Robbery".
Then there's the buyer's premium, and the seller's premium, and the VAT, and window tax.