Window Tax


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Related to Window Tax: Hearth Tax

Window Tax

A tax on the number of windows on a house. Window taxes existed in Britain and France during the 18th and 19th centuries. They were intended primarily to affect the wealthy, who tended to live in houses with more windows. In England, the tax was structured as a flat rate per window, with a variable rate applying after 10 windows. Because of the window tax, some homes had bricked up spaces for windows so owners easily could install windows if the tax were reduced or repealed.
References in periodicals archive ?
I know - a window tax - that should do save the day George, but not on static caravan windows eh.
I pay a window tax, I'll get over it, be near peace, never mention
There was a window tax and so the only the wealthy could afford glass, the windows of the dwellings on the lower floors were bricked up.
The entries cover all those things one is assumed to know such as the meaning of enclosures, advowsons, ridings, militia, saints' days, window tax, ossuaries, heraldry (one of the author's main interests), Martello towers, glebe, boroughs and so on and on.
Lynne Stopkewich (Kissed), working from a script by Dennis Foon (Long Life, Happiness & Prosperity), took her characters literally into the darkness for Windows, the story of a couple of artists who opt to cover up every window in their house and go without natural light, rather than pay a new window tax.
In this context, no government has ever introduced facilities of the one window tax collection for the industrial community of the country.
The levy system has not failed as such, but it is in the process of being bypassed by progress and transformed into a piece of fiscal history, alongside Pitt's Window Tax.
YES, the window tax lasted from 1697 to 1851 and applied to houses with more than six windows.
The Window Tax, although contemporaneous with the Glass Duty, was an assessed tax, based on the number of windows in a property, and was not related to the Glass Duty.
KEN Jarrett was very correct about the window tax in the 18th and 19th century.
Anon HOW soon before the Tories try to bring back the window tax, naming it the "extra daylight subsidy"?
HAS anybody ever heard of the Window Tax - the answer would probably be no but if you relate to your school days, the answer would probably be "yes".