windfall

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Windfall

A sudden, unexpected profit or gain. A windfall may occur, for example, after a company announces an earnings surprise and its stock consequently jumps significantly. Companies may also experience windfall when demand for their products skyrockets; for example, an umbrella manufacturer may see windfall during an especially rainy year. See also: Windfall shares, Windfall tax.

windfall

An unexpected profit or gain. An investor holding a stock that increases greatly in price because of an unexpected takeover offer receives a windfall.
References in periodicals archive ?
The windfall profits tax was very unfortunate because it suddenly made Mongolia one of the toughest tax regimes for mining," Oyun said.
The organisation commissioned Point Carbon Advisory Services, experts on the carbon market, to assess potential windfall profits in the power sectors of the UK, Germany, Spain, Italy and Poland.
While carbon trading has a crucial part to play in tackling climate change, these windfall profits will give it a bad name unless they are used to fund socially useful and green spending.
Algeria has become the latest African country to consider slapping windfall profit taxes on foreign oil companies.
The JSDA will accept brokerages' offers to return such windfall profits or contribute donations designed to help develop the backup computer system in the period between Feb.
The major oil companies are reaping huge windfall profits while consumers across the nation are facing the highest gasoline prices in recent memory," said CFA director of research Mark Cooper.
A US "crusade against evildoers" would mean windfall profits for Halliburton, which also supplies security to 150 US embassies and provides "everything from catering to laundry" to the US Army on overseas missions.
They have very high oil prices at the moment, and they are making windfall profits.
We define a corporation's ability to pay as windfall profits, which because it explicitly adjusts for differences in the risk associated with corporate investment, is a better measure of economic income than financial statement measures prevalent in prior research.
Yet he seems to have been less interested in windfall profits than in national policy; he saw the new outposts as an issue of national expansion and empire, "another public trust" (326).