WS

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WS

The two-character ISO 3166 country code for SAMOA.

WS

1. See: Warrant.

2. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for the Independent State of Samoa. This is the code used in international transactions to and from Samoan bank accounts.

3. ISO 3166-2 geocode for Samoa. This is used as an international standard for shipping to Samoa. Each Samoan district has its own code with the prefix "WS." For example, the code for the District of Atua is ISO 3166-2:WS-AT

WS

Used on the consolidated tape to indicate a warrant: G.WS 23.50.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Looking at risk awareness profiles, the investigators found that patients with autism and Down syndrome were less risk-aware than were their peers with Williams syndrome.
2) Williams syndrome is a rare, genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental disability, heart defects, and unusual facial features (i.
Donations are being invited for the Williams Syndrome Foundation.
Along with other traits, people with Williams syndrome have a heightened response to happy or smiling faces and are less likely to react to aggressive or angry faces.
Neuropsychological, Neurological and Neuroanatomical profile of Williams syndrome.
A detailed cardiac evaluation must be performed in all patients demonstrating the characteristic features of Williams syndrome because of the high frequency of cardiovascular anomalies and sudden death.
Examples include Williams syndrome, which affects one in 7,500 children and affects the heart and blood vessels, kidneys, muscles and skeleton, and causes learning difficulties.
Chapters discuss autism, Williams syndrome, dyslexia, dyspraxia, language, number sense and dyscalculia, ADHD, responses to stress, child maltreatment, and the development of the corticolimbic system.
In The {Strangest} Song--One Father's Quest to Help His Daughter Find Her Voice, author Teri Sforza chronicles the struggles of Howard and Sylvia Lenhoff to understand the connection between musical ability and Williams Syndrome, a disability that their daughter, Gloria, was born with.
Vicary (2004) compared individuals with Down syndrome and Williams syndrome regarding explicit and implicit memory function.
This is the first book to cover Williams syndrome and the genius musical abilities of many who have it.