Whistle Blowing

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Whistle Blowing

The practice in which an employee or other person publicly exposes the wrongdoings of a private company. For example, if a company is illegally dumping chemicals in a protected environment, a whistle blower may inform the proper authorities or, failing that, the media. Certain laws may protect whistleblowers from being fired or other negative consequences within the company.
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It then added: "Without denying the report, WikiLeaks simply asked, on its Twitter account, the source that published the news to 'show which cable this claim is based'.
fought at all for the right to inform WikiLeaks prior to the handover.
Beckett is a director of Polis, a media think tank at the venerable London School of Economics, and Ball is a journalist with the Guardian newspaper and a former WikiLeaks staffer.
If WikiLeaks does not find a way to remove this blockade, given our current levels of expenditure we will simply not be able to continue by the turn of the year," Assange said.
Assange, editor-in-chief and founder of WikiLeaks, ran an advertisement last week that featured a clip of himself watching protests at the Kasr al-Nil bridge in Cairo on January 28.
WikiLeaks is coordinating with lawyers in Denmark and Iceland and its credit card processing partner, DataCell, to sue the card operators for 'engaging in an unlawful, US influenced, financial blockade,' the report said.
At a session titled 'End of an Era of Secrecy', Sylvie Kauffman, editor-in-chief of Le Monde (France) which is an authorised media partner of anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks, outlined the changing role of the media with the emergence of the website, which publishes sensitive information and data.
As the state continued to block legal means for the public to obtain information about government activities, especially concerning national security, a new model for transparency emerged: WikiLeaks, a website that solicits and hosts leaked documents of all kinds, aims to acquire troves of data from the world's governments and other institutions, then dumps the information online for anyone to paw through.
Arabs believe world is better off thanks to Wikileaks
WikiLeaks has certainly made its mark in our world.
The whistle-blower website WikiLeaks has facilitated the destruction of Tunisia's tyrannical state with its release of classified information about rampant corruption in the north African government.
Several federal agencies have already advised employees that accessing WikiLeaks in any way to review the content either on or off the site will be grounds for disciplinary action--meaning that opening the New York Times on Saturday morning can prove to be a dangerous act of subversion.