White Collar Worker

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White Collar Worker

An office worker, especially an educated or respected one. White collar works include (but are not limited to) clerical employees, salespersons, retail managers, bankers and so forth. White collar workers are usually salaried (though many others work primarily on commission). White collar workers contrast with blue collar workers, who generally perform manual labor of some kind and/or have less education. Stereotypically, white collar workers earn more than blue collar workers, but this varies by job, industry and experience.
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He provides a few possible answers, one in particular that renders suspect the motivations of academics: in the current social hierarchy, in which white-collar workers are on top, the researchers, who are themselves the very white-collar workers they write about, benefit by maintaining the status quo.
White-collar workers (56%) reported using social media more than Qataris (35%) and blue-collar respondents (35%).
The results are reported in Table 3 and show that the largest employment effects are obtained from reducing workers' nonwage labor costs, especially for white-collar workers.
3 hours per week during weeks that they are working as compared to white-collar workers (excluding sales) who work 39.
The BNA PLUS report provides representation and decertification election statistics by major union affiliation, industry, unit size, state and for white-collar workers.
The union -- which represents land surveyors, crime lab and veterinary technicians and other white-collar workers -- held a two-day walkout in August that had little impact on city business.
Of course, the metonymy also extends to the lives of and economic realities enmeshing the white-collar workers whose bodies Havel bids us imagine and thence to corporate hierarchies and all that they imply.
announced that it, too, would freeze pension plans for its white-collar workers.
Given that blue-collar workers are less likely to practice healthy lifestyle behaviours than white-collar workers (Morris, Conrad, Marcantonio, Marks, & Ribisl, 1999), there is a need for health policymakers and health-promotion practitioners to address the circumstances of male blue-collar workers.
But occupational cancer affects blue-collar workers more than white-collar workers.
3 million salaried white-collar workers who were not entitled to overtime pay under the pre-existing regulations.
Using apprenticeship programs or technical schools, males became skilled workers and sometimes white-collar workers.