White Collar Worker

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White Collar Worker

An office worker, especially an educated or respected one. White collar works include (but are not limited to) clerical employees, salespersons, retail managers, bankers and so forth. White collar workers are usually salaried (though many others work primarily on commission). White collar workers contrast with blue collar workers, who generally perform manual labor of some kind and/or have less education. Stereotypically, white collar workers earn more than blue collar workers, but this varies by job, industry and experience.
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Under this calculus of honor, the carpenter threatened with losing his house was as deeply threatened as was the white-collar worker in similar straights--if not more so.
The hypothesis that white-collar workers would be far more advanced in the shift toward Spanish is supported by the results.
He presents a compelling argument for the idea that white-collar workers should want to reconstruct the attitudes society holds toward traditional laborers.
The results are reported in Table 3 and show that the largest employment effects are obtained from reducing workers' nonwage labor costs, especially for white-collar workers.
That Reich was known for exploiting the play of metal against fabric in many of her designs is obviously pertinent, but Havel's intention seems also to be an acknowledgement of her as someone who, like those white-collar workers referenced elsewhere, labored long and hard for scant recognition.
Data from former white-collar workers, however, suggest that retirement even at 65 years of age can be disappointingly empty and that a return to work is desirable (Macdonald, Brown, & Buchanan, 2001).
Using apprenticeship programs or technical schools, males became skilled workers and sometimes white-collar workers.
Researchers found that almost a fifth - 18 per cent - of vocational workers are happy in their work, compared to ten per cent of white-collar workers.
15% of managers and professionals said they had been bullied compared with 10% of skilled white-collar workers, 11% of skilled blue-collar workers and 9% of unskilled workers , with men and women equally likely to be victims.
On the other hand, just under half of Kinsey's male interviewees were white-collar workers, which he overrepresented as a percent of the population in the late 1940s.
It would make white-collar workers earning up to $100,000 eligible for overtime unless they meet certain qualifications as executive, professional, administrative, computer or outside sales employees.
Its study of happiness in the workplace found tradesmen and women were twice as likely to be ``extremely happy'' in their jobs compared to white-collar workers -a term generally given to office workers.