White Collar Crime

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White Collar Crime

A crime committed by an office worker within the context of his/her job, especially when the worker is educated or respected. For instance, a bank employee may divert pennies from customers' to his/her own account. White-collar criminals take advantage of their positions in the commission of their illegal acts. Ordinarily, white-collar crimes involve money; major examples include embezzlement, money laundering and some computer crimes. While white-collar crimes may appear victimless in their commission, they may have broader ramifications than street crimes such as burglary or theft. For example, a robber can only steal from one person or home at a time, while a white-collar criminal can embezzle funds from thousands or millions of investors.
References in periodicals archive ?
19, 2015 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- White-collar crime is one of the most destructive-and most under-policed-types of criminal activity in the United States today.
Tolman said consumer, environmental and white-collar crime issues top his agenda.
Any delay or failure to prosecute white-collar crime damages our justice system and our democracy.
Professor Mike Levi, of Cardiff University's Centre for Crime, Law and Justice, has been elected vice-president of the US White-Collar Crime Research Consortium.
The researchers have divided the progress of white-collar crime into 12 steps.
International white-collar crime has its tentacles across the entire world and stimulates other major crimes such as insurrection leading to rape, mutilation and murder.
If you recall, Jewell said he went to Perroni for one reason: He was the best at defending white-collar crimes.
The immediate relevance of the issue of white-collar crime as discussed in this volume by Professor Leap is brought into clear focus when one considers his contention that we are a culture that is based on trust.
THE firms recommended in the top tier in the table are particularly noted for complex white-collar crime work.
The effects of large-scale white-collar crime can often be more devastating than those of robbery or physical assault, but remain "hidden and ignored", said a think-tank report.
As a past president of the USA White-Collar Crime Research Consortium and chair of the Crime, Law and Deviance Section of the American Sociological Association, she has gained valuable insights, readily available in a key text book on corporate crime--'Corporate Crime, Law, and Social Control'.
1) Law enforcement officers who work in these locations or investigate white-collar crime or terrorism financing should know about and understand how to deal with hawala and other nontraditional financial centers.