White Collar Crime

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White Collar Crime

A crime committed by an office worker within the context of his/her job, especially when the worker is educated or respected. For instance, a bank employee may divert pennies from customers' to his/her own account. White-collar criminals take advantage of their positions in the commission of their illegal acts. Ordinarily, white-collar crimes involve money; major examples include embezzlement, money laundering and some computer crimes. While white-collar crimes may appear victimless in their commission, they may have broader ramifications than street crimes such as burglary or theft. For example, a robber can only steal from one person or home at a time, while a white-collar criminal can embezzle funds from thousands or millions of investors.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a statement Mr Howlin added: "Out of 13,000 gardai in the country, the notion that one can't be found to head up our investigations of white-collar crime within the ODCE is not credible.
I want to work on behalf of people who are victimized by white-collar crime or public corruption, the crimes that take money right out of the pockets of hardworking people,'' Mr.
With the explanation of this term in an intellectually technical manner by Sutherland (1949), White-Collar crime was proposed as a new kind of deviant behavior in modern criminology as compared to street crimes and juvenile delinquency.
The group promotes increased awareness of the impact of white-collar crime on society through dedicated research.
The Internet facilitates many types of white-collar crime.
The researchers have divided the progress of white-collar crime into 12 steps.
International white-collar crime has its tentacles across the entire world and stimulates other major crimes such as insurrection leading to rape, mutilation and murder.
If you recall, Jewell said he went to Perroni for one reason: He was the best at defending white-collar crimes.
Dishonest Dollars: The Dynamics of White-Collar Crime
This surge of self-control has been a variable that has been debated in discussion of white-collar crime (Szockyj and Geis, 2002; Geis, 2000; Reid and Yeagler, 1996, Benson and Moore, 1992).
THE firms recommended in the top tier in the table are particularly noted for complex white-collar crime work.
The effects of large-scale white-collar crime can often be more devastating than those of robbery or physical assault, but remain "hidden and ignored", said a think-tank report.