White Collar Crime

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White Collar Crime

A crime committed by an office worker within the context of his/her job, especially when the worker is educated or respected. For instance, a bank employee may divert pennies from customers' to his/her own account. White-collar criminals take advantage of their positions in the commission of their illegal acts. Ordinarily, white-collar crimes involve money; major examples include embezzlement, money laundering and some computer crimes. While white-collar crimes may appear victimless in their commission, they may have broader ramifications than street crimes such as burglary or theft. For example, a robber can only steal from one person or home at a time, while a white-collar criminal can embezzle funds from thousands or millions of investors.
References in periodicals archive ?
important and consistent themes relevant to white collar crime.
Copeland demonstrates a major difference between white collar crime and
In many white collar crime cases, a criminal investigators s initial contact with a subject prompts the criminal to contact a lawyer, who usually will advise the subject not to agree to an interview.
Wisenberg, "Federal White Collar Crime," http://prof.
The survey, which was conducted between January and April 1999 by the Training and Research Institute of the National White Collar Crime Center in Morgantown, West Virginia, is the first of its kind in nearly two decades.
Findings from the report show that during a 12-month period, one in every three households (36 percent) was victimized by a form of white collar crime.
It features strategies for mitigating potential individual and corporate liability with respect to white collar crime.
Delinsky, Member, Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC - "Challenges for the White Collar Crime Attorney";
May was previously Chair of the White Collar Crime Section of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and his is a past Co-Chair of the Defense Function Services Committee of the Criminal Justice Section of the American Bar Association.
He was a key participant in high-level case, legal, policy and legislative matters at the Department of Justice and served on the Attorney General's White Collar Crime Council.
One in three American households is now the victim of "white collar" crime according to new research conducted by the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C).
The survey, conducted between January and April 1999 by the Training and Research Institute of the National White Collar Crime Center in Morgantown, W.