White Collar Crime

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White Collar Crime

A crime committed by an office worker within the context of his/her job, especially when the worker is educated or respected. For instance, a bank employee may divert pennies from customers' to his/her own account. White-collar criminals take advantage of their positions in the commission of their illegal acts. Ordinarily, white-collar crimes involve money; major examples include embezzlement, money laundering and some computer crimes. While white-collar crimes may appear victimless in their commission, they may have broader ramifications than street crimes such as burglary or theft. For example, a robber can only steal from one person or home at a time, while a white-collar criminal can embezzle funds from thousands or millions of investors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sirota, David, "US Prosecution of White Collar Crime Hits 20-Year Low," International Business Times, August 4, 2015.
May was previously Chair of the White Collar Crime Section of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and his is a past Co-Chair of the Defense Function Services Committee of the Criminal Justice Section of the American Bar Association.
Welcome to the Twenty-Seventh Annual Survey of White Collar Crime.
legislation and prosecution of white collar crime is a subject of
A former federal prosecutor, who now advises white collar criminal defense attorneys, identifies attempts by white collar crime suspects to cover up their crimes as one of their biggest mistakes: "a dangerous pitfall occurs when the client starts falsely denying culpability about the specifics of his alleged offense.
HOUSEHOLD is now the victim of white collar crime, according to new research conducted by the National White Collar Crime Center.
The size and scope of the white collar crime problem, however, are not reflected in the nation's indictment and conviction rates.
Welcome to the Twentieth Anniversary issue of the Annual Survey of White Collar Crime.
It features strategies for mitigating potential individual and corporate liability with respect to white collar crime.
Two former executives, who were convicted of white collar crimes and served time in prison for their offenses, talked about their experiences and how they came to land in federal prison.
D'Amuro joined the FBI in 1979, and has worked on a wide array of criminal investigations, including white collar crimes, major property crimes, violent crime, organized crime, and terrorism.
The public sees white collar crimes in a harsher light, now commonly viewing them as being as serious as traditional types of crime such as assault, robbery and burglary.