White Collar Crime


Also found in: Legal, Encyclopedia.

White Collar Crime

A crime committed by an office worker within the context of his/her job, especially when the worker is educated or respected. For instance, a bank employee may divert pennies from customers' to his/her own account. White-collar criminals take advantage of their positions in the commission of their illegal acts. Ordinarily, white-collar crimes involve money; major examples include embezzlement, money laundering and some computer crimes. While white-collar crimes may appear victimless in their commission, they may have broader ramifications than street crimes such as burglary or theft. For example, a robber can only steal from one person or home at a time, while a white-collar criminal can embezzle funds from thousands or millions of investors.
References in periodicals archive ?
The National White Collar Crime Control Act of 2017 authorizes funding through the Department of Justices Bureau of Justice Assistance to improve the identification, investigation and prosecution of white collar crimes.
I am assured that the resources allocated to the Garda Bureau of Fraud Investigation are sufficient, and I will respond as necessary to any further legislative needs raised by An Garda Siochana or any of the other bodies involved in the investigation and prosecution of white collar crime.
important and consistent themes relevant to white collar crime.
It issues reports and other documents on white collar crime as well as staging seminars and stockpiling research contacts.
The aim of the NW3C in administering the National Public Survey on White Collar Crime was to add broader and more-current information to the insights furnished by prior surveys.
In many white collar crime cases, a criminal investigators s initial contact with a subject prompts the criminal to contact a lawyer, who usually will advise the subject not to agree to an interview.
The panelists cited that their number one concern in fighting white collar crime is the lack of resources for those that investigate and prosecute white-collar crime.
The book shows how employer, managers and auditors can help keep their organization safe from embezzlement, tax evasion, deception and other forms of white collar crime that endanger the assets and integrity of businesses and government agencies.
Many offenders in other areas of white collar crime are of similarly low status, and variations within categories are in themselves worthy of analysis (Croall 1992; Shapiro 1990).
Partner Michael Leotta was named a national vice chair of the American Bar Association's (ABA) White Collar Crime Committee.
Writing primarily for students in courses on white collar crime, federal criminal law, and corporate crime, Strader says the material might also prove useful to practicing lawyers, judges, law clerks, and researchers interested in the area.
For law students and practitioners, this comprehensive overview of white collar crime examines federal statutes relating to this class of criminal activity and provides detailed information on criminal laws, procedures, and remedies related to white collar crime.