Whistleblower

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Whistleblower

An employee or other person who publicly exposes the wrongdoings of a private company. For example, if a company is illegally dumping chemicals in a protected environment, a whistleblower may tell the proper authorities or, failing that, the media. Certain laws may protect whistleblowers from being fired or other negative consequences within the company.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Independent National Officer will provide an independent and external level of review on the handling of whistleblowing cases in NHS Scotland.
Internal whistleblowing happens within company walls, and is typically performed by an employee in regards to a coworker or superior.
The suspensions follow an independent external investigation into three separate whistleblowing complaints received by the trust.
Whistleblowing can be analyzed as a form of self-defense or defense of the community.
This article looks at actions organizations can take to avoid inadvertently discouraging fraud reporting and instead promote whistleblowing.
From 2008 to 2012 the commission said it received 301,000 whistleblowing reports online.
The testimonies were submitted by Patients First to Sir Robert Francis QC, who is leading an independent review of whistleblowing within the NHS in England.
While whistleblowing is a relatively new phenomenon, it is one that is not only rapidly gathering momentum but will soon prove to be part and parcel of everyday business life, and it should be encouraged by every business owner and leader.
Other topics addressed are employee benefits; workers' compensation; safety and environmental regulations; immigration law compliance, secondment, and foreign assignment; restrictive covenants and protection of trade secrets and confidential information; protection of whistleblowing claims; anti-discrimination laws; smoking, drugs, and alcohol in the workplace; AIDS, HIV, SARS, and bloodborne pathogens; dress and grooming; employee privacy, technology, and transfer of personal data; investigations of discrimination, harassment, fraud, theft, and whistleblowing; affirmative action/non-discrimination requirements; dispute resolution; recordkeeping, data protection, and employee access to personnel files and records; and required notices and postings.
Whistleblowing is central to these legislative reforms and remains the most common, effective way to detect fraud.
The initiative for the investigation came from Hans-Christian Stroebele of the German Green Party who last year traveled to Moscow to meet whistleblowing fugitive Edward Snowden.
Whistleblowing activities are frequently misunderstood and the term is often misused resulting in confusion regarding employees' rights and responsibilities when reporting Waste, Fraud, Abuse, or Misconduct.