Whistleblower

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Whistleblower

An employee or other person who publicly exposes the wrongdoings of a private company. For example, if a company is illegally dumping chemicals in a protected environment, a whistleblower may tell the proper authorities or, failing that, the media. Certain laws may protect whistleblowers from being fired or other negative consequences within the company.
References in periodicals archive ?
Earlier this month, the Connecticut Supreme Court closed a case with a ruling that benefits all potential whistleblowers in the state.
Breakthrough in Protecting International Whistleblowers: Non-United States Citizens Now Entitled to Whistleblower Protections and Rewards" will take place at the Unitic Business Center, Sarajevo, BiH, on Tuesday, May 26, 2015 at 11:00 a.
Whistleblowers may make their allegations internally (for example, to other people within the accused organization) or externally (to regulators, law enforcement agencies, to the media or to groups concerned with the issues).
the protections available to whistleblowers under the law,
McKessy, chief of the OWB, continues to encourage whistleblowers to come forward without fear of retaliation.
previously treated tax whistleblowers as "skunks at a picnic.
He said it was up to Congress to amend the statute to provide confidentiality for whistleblowers, given the legislative "choice of a public forum for such actions.
securities laws, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, are eligible for an award of l0-30% of the SEC recovery if the SEC recoups in excess of SI million, according to a whistleblower provision in the Dodd-Frank Wail Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, effective July 21, 201U, codified in a new Section 21F of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
Most importantly, the final rule does not require whistleblowers to report through internal corporate channels before providing information to the SEC.
Timely Tips: Potential whistleblowers are incentivised to come forward sooner rather than later with 'timely' information not yet known to the SEC.
Dodd-Frank further stipulates that whistleblowers could receive as much as 30 percent of any fines, penalties, or the repayment of losses resulting from their reports.
In this handbook for employees and managers, he explains the law regarding whistleblowers, tells how to comply, and gives whistleblowers advice on protecting themselves from retaliation.