Whistleblower

(redirected from Whistle blowers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

Whistleblower

An employee or other person who publicly exposes the wrongdoings of a private company. For example, if a company is illegally dumping chemicals in a protected environment, a whistleblower may tell the proper authorities or, failing that, the media. Certain laws may protect whistleblowers from being fired or other negative consequences within the company.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the launch, matters and procedures set out in whistle blowing policy were discussed especially those relating to protection of the whistle blower (reporter) as well as case studies and issues which have been reported in some institutions around the world.
The Whistle Blowers Protection Bill was approved by the Cabinet of India in 2011 as part of a drive to eliminate corruption in the country's bureaucracy.
Green's sophisticated and influential coverage of widespread tax avoidance among US corporations amid ambivalent, ineffectual use by the Internal Revenue Service of the whistle blower program that Congress created to assist the agency in 2006.
Ms Harney added: "These new whistle blower provisions should encourage a culture of openness and accountability throughout the health services so that employees can report any concerns they may have in relation to their workplace.
She had become a whistle blower to try to stop an ``illegal war``.
Seeing whistle blowers on the cover of a national magazine is odd, though.
She pointed out: 'It can be difficult to spot cartels from the outside and whistle blowers will play a crucial role.
So far, that isn't happening in Canada despite the fact the Liberal government recently created a position that appears the government has decided it's going to offer protection to whistle blowers.
The Project on Government Oversight (POGO), a government watchdog group that supports whistle blowers, was late to the oil royalty game.
And, of course, some whistle blowers may actually be acting out of self-interest (Weber, 1995).