Whistle blower


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Whistle blower

A person who has knowledge of fraudulent activities inside a firm or government agency, who is protected from the employer's retribution by federal law.

Whistle Blower

An employee of a company who has knowledge of illegal activities and reports them to the authorities. Generally speaking, a whistle blower reports the activities out of a sense of conscience or out of a desire to avoid criminal charges himself/herself. Under federal law, whistle blowers may not be fired, but some companies find ways around this.
References in periodicals archive ?
Research has shown that most whistle blowers are not disgruntled employees (Brabeck 1984; Glazer and Glazer 1987 and 1989; Miceli and Near 1992; Near and Miceli 1987).
Whistle blowers act on attitudes akin to the public-service ethic in another way, for it is well known that whistle blowing involves self-sacrifice.
PSM may not account for all whistle blowing because not all whistle blowers have noble motives.
11) This might suggest that the negative response to whistle blowers can, in some cases, stem from them contravening the established collegial norms of the profession, not necessarily because of the potential to expose professional wrong-doing.
She mentioned that after the mauling incident of actor Vhong Navarro, other important issues exposed by whistle blowers were ignored.
Seeing whistle blowers on the cover of a national magazine is odd, though.
By contrast, blue-collar whistle blowers who report dangerous or unhealthy working conditions and practices on the factory floor often just get a hard time, though their concerns are no less important.
For example, if the whistle blowers expose some wrongdoing in the government or mismanagement, they are given a certain percentage as a reward.
The Liberal government promised to create legislation to protect whistle blowers before the 1993 election.
In the long term, that may or may not discourage other whistle blowers and weaken the FCA.
Besides defending the dismissal process on behalf of the whistle blowers, the Chicago Teachers Union--whose attorneys were provided with a summary of the findings in this article and declined to comment on the specific cases they handled--argues that the job of every union is to protect its members.
This is necessary to assure whistle blowers and other staff that corrupt administrators, not whistle blowers, will be penalized under streamlined dismissal procedures.