area

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Related to Wernicke's area: Wernicke's encephalopathy, Wernicke's aphasia, Broca's area, Wernicke's syndrome

Area

The size of a two-dimensional space. One calculates the area by multiplying the area's length by its width.

area

A measurement of the square footage contained within certain boundaries.
References in periodicals archive ?
The central portion of Wernicke's area (BA 22) is said to be inactive in PWS (Braun et al.
There must be an alternate neural route connecting Broca's area and Wernicke's area (Brown, 1975).
But, now, research that analyzed more than 100 imaging studies concludes that Wernicke's area is in the wrong location.
Because Broca's area affects speech output (forming words), and Wernicke's area affects input (understanding words), the sufferer can still understand and speak quite well, but putting the two together is nearly impossible.
The brain pathway for normal reading has also been identified (from visual area to angular gyrus to Wernicke's area to Broca's area), as have the sequences involved in memory storage.
According to Julian Jaynes, the phenomenon of inspiration as the hearing of voices (of the Muses or of any other agency) is explained by the fact that the right hemisphere (parieto/temporal location corresponding to Wernicke's area) originates auditory signals which are transmitted to the left hemisphere's Wernicke's area through the anterior commissure.
These include Wernicke's area, which contributes to language comprehension, as well as parts of the visual cortex and a section of the association cortex considered pivotal to integrating the sight of printed letters with their corresponding sounds.
Within this latter part of the brain, Wernicke's area is believed to be responsible for finding words and feeding them to other parts of the brain.
Wernicke's area (W) and surrounding areas, including angular gyrus (AG) and supramarginal gyrus (SG), are heteromodal areas that may be responsible for the integration of spoken and written word forms with arbitrary associations that give rise to meaning or semantics (Mesulam, 1998; Pugh et al.
In humans, a swath of neural tissue, known as Wernicke's area, encompasses the entire planum temporale and helps to orchestrate language comprehension.