welfare state

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Welfare State

The concept in which a government is or views itself as responsible for providing some minimum economic security for citizens. For example, the government may guarantee housing, work and a minimum income for all citizens. Less comprehensively, a government may provide income during periods of unemployment or poverty. Most governments have a welfare state to some degree. Proponents view welfare states as a form of economic justice. Critics contend that they are detrimental to GDP growth and promote needless dependency.

welfare state

a country that provides comprehensive SOCIAL-SECURITY BENEFITS such as state health services, state retirement pensions, unemployment and sickness benefits, etc. See TRANSFER PAYMENTS, GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Palmer and the other authors use mind-boggling figures to show just how absurdly bloated and mismanaged the modern welfare state is today, with the U.
Consequently, theories pertaining to welfare states and the impact of social change had to rely on conjectures rather than empirical support.
Identifying five 'evils' in society that the state could remedy - disease, squalor, idleness, ignorance and want - the report was hugely influential amongst the general public, and that popular will led to the establishment of the welfare state as we know it.
Asbjorn Wahl, The Rise and Fall of the Welfare State, Pluto Press, London, 2011.
We can distinguish three ways to run a welfare state (or any interventionist state for that matter):
Daly tries to demonstrate the links among all of these, though her focus is tilted towards the welfare state.
Indeed, even if the politicians were not motivated by ulterior motives, it is possible that their policies will produce a situation where the weaker and less privileged sections of society might, against the core principles of social democratic welfare states, be stigmatised and blamed for depending on others to carry them.
In Never Enough, William Voegeli examines the welfare state, its history in America, and arguments for and against its existence.
There seems to be a strong tension, though, between Pimpare's point that a welfare state is good political economy, his recognition of multiple welfare states throughout history, and his strong emphasis on continuity in the experience of the poor in America.
At the same time, this makes reform changes more or less necessary simply because of the path-dependency of the developments of the welfare states.
This claim has been largely discredited as evidence of the survival of welfare states has mounted (e.
Indeed, it is sometimes argued that, to the extent that generous welfare states reduce post-tax and transfer inequality, they simply make up for the damage done to pre-tax and transfer inequality levels.