Weapon of Mass Destruction

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Weapon of Mass Destruction

Any weapon designed to kill human beings in exceptionally large numbers. Examples include biological, chemical and nuclear weapons. International agreements limit the spread of these weapons and they are rarely used in practice. However, they remain a significant political risk in some parts of the world.
References in periodicals archive ?
Counterproliferation is the ability to combat weapons of mass destruction use through kinetic and sustained operations to decisively defeat weapons of mass destruction-armed adversaries.
Governments and relevant intergovernmental organizations and nongovernmental actors should begin preparations for a world summit on disarmament, non-proliferation, and terrorist use of weapons of mass destruction to generate new momentum for concerted international action.
The axis was originally between weapons of mass destruction and terrorism, with all the emphasis on Saddam.
In the 23 months I was there, I never saw anything that I would characterise as evidence of weapons of mass destruction,' Mr O'Neill said.
They had had weapons of mass destruction but there weren't any longer.
In a statement, Gaddafi said his country wanted to lead by example "in building a new world free of weapons of mass destruction and all kinds of terrorism, with the aim of preserving international peace and security and progress for humanity".
He saidMr Gaddafihadconfirmed he had been secretly seeking to develop weapons of mass destruction, including long-range ballistic missiles, but had approached the UK in March following successful negotiations over the Lockerbie downing of Pan Am flight 103 to see how the issue could be resolved.
The Prime Minister chose Durham as his setting to disclose that Libya has now agreed to abandon its weapons of mass destruction.
Saddam Hussein claimed that he had no weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.
In Russia as part of a diplomatic circus gathered in the city to celebrate its 300th anniversary, Mr Blair said yesterday: 'What we have said about weapons of mass destruction is that there is no doubt at all that Saddam had weapons of mass destruction and has used weapons of mass destruction.
Iraq's alleged possession of weapons of mass destruction was cited as the main reason for the war but none has been found since Saddam's regime fell more than three weeks ago.
The US Under-Secretary of State for arms control and international security John Bolton makes it clear that the failure of the UN inspectors to come up with any hard evidence of weapons of mass destruction will not dissuade Washington from its insistence that Baghdad must be disarmed.

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