Right to Privacy

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Right to Privacy

The right not to be violated without one's consent. For example, the right to privacy includes the right to be secure in one's own person or home. The right to privacy in guaranteed in many jurisdictions. Other jurisdictions that do not explicitly provide a right to privacy may provide some protections. For example, a government may prohibit searches in a private area without a warrant.
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57) Given Nixon's agenda, also unsurprising was the Burger Court's slow but steady devolution of the Warren Court criminal procedure decisions.
Sunstein, supra note 69, at 205 ("The Warren Court is
If Brandeis had aligned himself with Holmes and Frankfurter, Meyer and Pierce would likely have been radioactive to Warren Court liberals.
Seismic shifts--including industrialization, the Lochner era and its expansionist response to the Progressive Era, two world wars, anti-McCarthyism, Vietnam, Watergate, stagflation, the constitutional "stretch" of the Burger and Warren Courts triggering the birth of Originalism, and the First Gulf War--impacted American culture, economics, and politics.
is the Warren Court, responsible for Brown, Loving, and Katz, three
37) So during the Warren Court era, people become accustomed to the Supreme Court raising the floor of constitutional protection.
Connecticut, the 1965 Warren Court decision often thought to have found a general constitutional right to privacy, Bork attempted to show that it is equally important to define principles with sufficient precision that they become capable of neutral application.
While Warren Court defenders are likely flattered by such analogies, the comparison may not be warranted.
Like previous courts, the fractious Warren court that decided Brown made every effort to connect itself to existing law, and so it cast itself, as had courts before and after it, in the role of extending or filling in existing principles of law.
The most famous case of the Warren Court was Brown v.