War Bond


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War Bond

In the United States, a formerly-issued savings bond, exempt from state and local taxes, with a fixed interest rate. These bonds were sold at three-fourths of face value and paid par upon maturity, which was originally 10 years, but later became 30 or 40 years. They began to be issued to help finance American involvement in World War II but they continued to be issued thereafter. They were non-transferable and must either have been held or redeemed. They were known formally as series E bonds. In 1980, the government stopped issuing war bonds and replaced them with Series EE bonds. For a time, war bonds were exchangeable for Series H or Series HH bonds, but this is no longer the case.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indicative of the War Stamps and War Bond drama authored for these pupils in Squanderbug's Mother Goose, which features Everyboy and Everygirl figures, Phil and Lis , who are led by a kindly neighbor, Miss Moppity, through the world of a modernized, wartime Mother Goose where they meet nursery rhyme characters and the villain of the piece, Squanderbug, who is the allegorical image of spendthrift, inflation prone America.
By 1944, "the number of members in military service had grown to ninety-nine, and church members had purchased $2,000 in war bonds to honor them, donors selecting individuals as a memorial.
For the next three years, Fischer toured the home front's service clubs and town halls in war bond drives, performing with headliners such as western legend Dale Evans.
It's been 60 years, but Walker still has the $25 war bond purchased by his parents, in his name.
They might become angry enough to do something about it: enlist, buy a war bond, or volunteer for an overtime shift.
Government subsequently issued posters of Rockwell's paintings in a highly successful war bond campaign that raised more than $132 million for the war effort.
The three surviving flag-raisers are taken away from their unit by government authorities and forced to be the chief attraction in what they are told is a much-needed war bond drive.
Many of these stories, which take place during WW II, have a patriotic theme: the gang recycles scrap metal, plants a Victory Garden and raises money to buy a war bond.
In recent weeks, the war bond concept has gained widespread bipartisan support from national drug policy director William J.
A week later, the ECHO announced Liverpool's completed War Bond contribution to be PS13,013,746 9s 6d.
Wasn't the war really about the egos and territorial ambitions of the Europeans or the salvation of our domestic banking houses, which had floated many large war bond offerings?