Black Tuesday

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Black Tuesday

The date of the third large stock market crash that presaged the Great Depression. While the Great Depression had already begun in some areas, Black Tuesday confirmed fears felt by investors that the end of the speculative bubble that had marked most investing in the 1920s had arrived. Black Tuesday occurred on October 29, 1929; on this day, the Dow Jones Industrial Average lost nearly 12% of its value after having lost almost 13% the previous day on Black Monday. The Great Depression contributed to the formation of most regulation still in force today. See also: Black Thursday.

Black Tuesday

A widely used reference to October 29, 1929, the date of the greatest frenzy on the New York Stock Exchange during the Great Crash. Security prices plunged, volume surged to more than 16 million shares, and the ticker tape ran hours behind trading on the floor.
References in periodicals archive ?
The worst period was from the Wall Street Crash of 1929 to about 1932, but in places such as Jarrow, the unemployment rate hardly dipped below 50% until the economy was mobilised in 1940.
By the late 1880s Royal Worcester was home to more than 700 workers, and by the 20th century it became extremely popular in the USA, although the Wall Street crash of 1929 saw falling demand for luxury items and Royal Worcester narrowly escaped closure in the early 1930s.
He today acknowledged his views were no longer fashionable, but compared the coalition's package of deep spending cuts to the fiscal retrenchment which tipped the world into lengthy depression following the Wall Street Crash of 1929.
The Wall Street Crash of 1929 ushered in a frightening new world that would make even heavier demands on the enterprise, imagination and energy of [publishers]" lain Stevenson writes in BookMakers, his history of a century of British publishing from the introduction of fixed book prices via the Net Book Agreement in 1900 to their abandonment by publishers in 1995.
The SEC and CFTC were set up in the 1930s in response to the Wall Street crash of 1929 to supervise the securities and futures markets respectively.
The Wall Street Crash of 1929 made a dent in Kahn's financial empire, and he was forced to call off the project in 1931.
He said he recovery could be a false dawn and likening the stock market gains to those seen in the wake of the Wall Street crash of 1929.
Events he lived through included the death of queen Victoria in 1901, the sinking of the Titanic in 1912, the invention of television by John Logie Baird in the 1920s and the Wall Street crash of 1929.
When we look at the overall statistics, the longest - and arguably worse - recession was the Wall Street crash of 1929 which lasted 43 months.
After the Wall Street Crash of 1929, it was 15 years before the leaders of the world got together to build a new global framework to restore growth and prosperity, he said.
Following the Wall Street crash of 1929, a global slowdown ensued but, rather than stimulating growth, governments attempted to balance budgets.
If he looked at his history books he would discover that theUSAonlymanaged to recover from the Wall Street Crash of 1929 by spending money.