waiver

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Waiver

A statement of the voluntary surrender of a right. For example, suppose a company provides customers a service that might be dangerous, such as bungee jumping. The company may require customers to sign a waiver relinquishing the right to sue the company for negligence if a problem occurs. This reduces the company's risk in the conduct of its business.

waiver

The voluntary relinquishment of a known right, remedy, claim, or privilege.
References in periodicals archive ?
A common misconception that many individuals make with immigration waivers is that they are simple and can be managed without help from a licensed immigration lawyer.
Calibre Auto-Waivers is gaining a strong following because an automatic waiver flow maintains rigorous sign-off checking while eliminating days of wasted time reviewing violations that have already been waived," said Michael Buehler-Garcia, senior director of Calibre Design Solutions Marketing.
The original waivers granted states more time to help 100 percent of their students achieve proficiency in reading/language arts and mathematics.
Finally, there is one Department of Defense (DoD)--wide study of waiver status on attrition and performance, although it focuses on felony and serious waivers only.
The key is to determine the "applicable law" as to parental liability waivers or any other document used in an attempt to manage an organization's risk.
Now it is our job to ensure all families of children with disabilities are aware of these options and that each state develop their waivers according to the needs of the children and families it serves.
We are hopeful the state has contacted the federal government to get them to agree (the penalties) should not be taken away from the waiver funding," Kerr said.
The availability of taxpayer relief in these situations is a clear indication of the Service's plan to apply liberally its authority to grant waivers under the hardship exception.
In revenue procedure 2003-16, the IRS explained how taxpayers can apply for a waiver of the 60-day rollover period and when a situation merits an automatic waiver.
Plagued by cumbersome paperwork and delays, the federal waiver process frustrated states for years.
HHS has also taken a number of administrative steps to promote the use of waivers and to encourage consumer-directed services.
For instance, section 2176 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) of 1981 authorized waivers to provide expanded home and community-based care to Medicaid recipients who have disabilities and otherwise would receive more costly institutional care (Miller, 1992; Jacobson, Lindsey, & Pascal, 1989).