National Labor Relations Act

(redirected from Wagner Act of 1935)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

National Labor Relations Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1935, that protects workers from employer retaliation if they form a labor union. It prohibits employers from coercing employees into refraining from organizing. It also prohibits employers from discriminating against employees who argue publicly in favor or against organizing and requires companies to negotiate with employee representatives. It requires each unit of employees to be represented only by one organization. The Act created the National Labor Relations Board, which investigates and enforces potential violations. It is also called the Wagner Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Wagner Act of 1935, which guaranteed unions the fight to organize and bargain collectively, recognized that workers in mass-production industries were subject to autocratic rule and worthy of government protection.
The Wagner Act of 1935 regulates labor relations in the private sector and created the National Labor Relations Act to administer the Act.
This is an outrageous throwback to the old days of labor turmoil before the Wagner Act of 1935 finally outlawed the practice of management infiltration and spying on union activities," said CWA President Morton Bahr.
But today the Wagner Act of 1935, which guaranteed this right, might just as well not exist.
Public employees, however, failed to share in the rights of the rest of the union movement when the labor movement was formally legitimized in the Wagner Act of 1935 (Nelson, 1990).