National Labor Relations Act

(redirected from Wagner Act of 1935)

National Labor Relations Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1935, that protects workers from employer retaliation if they form a labor union. It prohibits employers from coercing employees into refraining from organizing. It also prohibits employers from discriminating against employees who argue publicly in favor or against organizing and requires companies to negotiate with employee representatives. It requires each unit of employees to be represented only by one organization. The Act created the National Labor Relations Board, which investigates and enforces potential violations. It is also called the Wagner Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the grassroots level, however, many black workers found that labor unions were using their newfound powers under the Railway Labor Act as amended in 1934 and the Wagner Act of 1935 to exclude them.
Further, the two nations generally share a common labor law blueprint -- in the US, it is the Wagner Act of 1935, the general principles of which were also adopted in most Canadian jurisdictions.
The Wagner Act of 1935, which created the NLRB, ignored the interests of civil rights groups and instead ensured the rights of white workers in segregated blue-collar unions.
The Wagner Act of 1935, which guaranteed unions the fight to organize and bargain collectively, recognized that workers in mass-production industries were subject to autocratic rule and worthy of government protection.
The Wagner Act of 1935 regulates labor relations in the private sector and created the National Labor Relations Act to administer the Act.
He implemented progressive labor policies at his automobile plants, yet violated labor-friendly legislation like the Wagner Act of 1935 and treated unions with open contempt.
But today the Wagner Act of 1935, which guaranteed this right, might just as well not exist.
Public employees, however, failed to share in the rights of the rest of the union movement when the labor movement was formally legitimized in the Wagner Act of 1935 (Nelson, 1990).
The workers are heartened by the election of Roosevelt in 1932 and especially by the Wagner Act of 1935.
In this important book, Ruth O'Brien challenges us to rethink how the National Labor Relations or Wagner Act of 1935, the landmark collective bargaining policy that protected and advanced the rights of workers, was conceived and defined.