National Labor Relations Act

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National Labor Relations Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1935, that protects workers from employer retaliation if they form a labor union. It prohibits employers from coercing employees into refraining from organizing. It also prohibits employers from discriminating against employees who argue publicly in favor or against organizing and requires companies to negotiate with employee representatives. It requires each unit of employees to be represented only by one organization. The Act created the National Labor Relations Board, which investigates and enforces potential violations. It is also called the Wagner Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the 1932 election, Congress passed the Wagner Act, which established the rights of unions to organize and strike and created employer unfair labor practices.
It was the Wagner Act that gave employees, under [section]7, the right to form and join unions and to go on strike; and under [section]8, it obligated employers to bargain with them.
Their struggles with loyalty investigations comprise the middle two of seven chapters, but their lives are woven throughout the study, beginning with Mary spearheading the League of Women Shoppers in the 1936 test case that validated the Wagner Act her husband wrote.
He also might have explored the role played by Louis Brandeis and Louis Marshall, like Schiff assimilated German Jews, who settled the 1910 cloakmakers' strike through principles subsequently enacted into law by the New Deal Wagner Act.
I believe that the Wagner Act is Exhibit 1 for many radicals and liberals looking back on the successes and failures of the New Deal and of their own lives.
Specifically, the union wants to use the force of government, mainly the Wagner Act, to coerce some people to join unions and to coerce business owners to "bargain" with unions under threat of government penalties if the owners do not concede to union demands.
I will first outline the goals of the Wagner Act (the NLRA's progenitor legislation), and then explain how the NLRA achieved those goals.
the Wagner Act, Keynesianism, and economic regulation) were institutionalized while social justice issues were left largely to the side.
Roosevelt's chief nonparty backer, the CIO, to a great extent, a creature of the New Deal's Wagner Act, had relied heavily on Communist organizers in the 1930s.
When the Wagner Act was passed by Congress in 1935, it immediately transformed labour relations in the US.
The NLRB is a creature of the National Labor Relations Act -- aka the Wagner Act -- signed into law by President Franklin D.
The Wagner Act had little or no effect, however, because it was widely expected that it too would be ruled unconstitutional.