Wages Council


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Wages Council

One of a number of boards in the United Kingdom that formerly set minimum wages. One wages council existed for each low-pay industry and each had the authority to raise or lower the minimum wage for that industry. Most wage councils were abolished in the early 1990s. In the late 1990s, the National Minimum Wage was passed, eliminating the need for the councils.

Wages Council

a UK body which stipulated minimum levels of WAGES and CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT in certain industries. Wages Councils were abolished in 1993. See MINIMUM WAGE RATE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wages councils were the brainchild of Winston Churchill (then known as trade boards).
He also said that in discussions with the National Wages Council and the federation, officials have taken into account living expenses as well as the current state of the country's economy.
s (1982) study of former Wages Council industries in the late 1970s found that 24 stamped or pressed metalware firms regarded their female press operators as more highly skilled than their male labourers, but paid the men a higher minimum time rate (p.
CAIRO: The National Wages Council (NWC) set the minimum wage at LE 400 Thursday, following an administrative court ruling on Tuesday that the government must set a minimum wage in line with the cost of living.
The ruling upholds an earlier administrative court verdict issued in May that found that the National Wages Council established under the Labor Law passed in 2003 must set a minimum wage applicable in both the public and private sectors.
The Minimum Wages Council, which was established in 2003, again in violation of the constitution, has failed to fulfill its primary mandate; that is to reset the national minimum wage, which has led to demonstrations by hundreds of employees living under the poverty line to agitate for a minimum wage of LE 1,200.
Last week the Egyptian Center for Economic and Social Rights (ECESR) won a court order obliging the National Wages Council established in 2003 to put in place a minimum wage in line with the cost of living.
The ruling issued on Tuesday obliges Prime Minister Ahmed Nazif and Minister of Economic Development Osman Mohamed Osman, also head of the National Wages Council.
Wales TUC has consistently called for more employers to pay the Living Wage along with action at every level of government to drive up pay, including the creation of modern wages councils.
But we need to see a far wider commitment to pay the living wage from government, employers and modern wages councils - to drive up productivity and set higher minimum rates in industries where employers can afford to pay their staff more.
That's why we need to find new ways for employers and unions to work together to improve productivity and set higher wages, agreed at a sector level by modern wages councils, so that workers and businesses can both get a fair deal.
The number of living wage employers is growing rapidly and unions are playing their part in encouraging more employers to sign up and pay it, but we need to see a far wider commitment to pay the living wage from government, employers and modern wages councils, to drive up productivity and set higher minimum rates in industries where employers can afford to pay their staff more.