Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act

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Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act

Informally called the WARN Act. Legislation in the United States, passed in 1988, that requires employers with more than 100 employees to provide at least 60 days' notice before a mass layoff. The employer must also provide notice to local authorities, an employment transition organization and the labor union, if applicable. The WARN Act is intended to protect employees and allow them to look for other work during the 60 days.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increasing the amount of worker claims entitled to priority payment for unpaid wages and contributions to employee benefit plans up to $20,000; Eliminating the difficult-to-prove restriction in current law that wage and benefit claims must be earned within 180 days of the bankruptcy filing in order to be entitled to priority payment; Allowing employees to assert claims for losses in certain defined contribution plans when such losses result from employer fraud or breach of fiduciary duty; Establishing a new priority administrative expense for workers severance pay; and Clarifying that back pay awards for WARN Act damages are entitled to the same priority as back pay for other legal violations.
However, the company said in a federal WARN Act notice in April that nearly 300 New Future miners would be laid off later in the year.
The WARN Act states employers must provide at least 60 calendar days of notice prior to any covered plant closing or mass layoff.
3 million in priority wage claims for pre-bankruptcy state and federal WARN Act violations.
WARN Act notification is required 60 days in advance under certain circumstances when there is a potential for layoffs of more than 50 employees for a period in excess of six months.
Even then, the notice obligations contained in the federal WARN Act are triggered only when there is a "mass layoff" or a "plant closing" as defined by the statute.
At this point, no one outside the three companies knows for sure why they chose not to comply with the WARN Act, because none will disclose to the public how many people were employed locally and how many lost their jobs.
Established by the WARN Act in 2006, WEA is a US voluntary national emergency alert system that is designed to deliver critical messages to the public.
Established by the WARN Act in 2006, CMAS is a voluntary national emergency alert system designed to deliver critical messages to the public, including presidential emergency messages, AMBER alerts and imminent threats to life and property.
The federal WARN Act requires employers with 100 or more employees to provide notification 60 business days in advance of plant closings or mass layoffs.
Recently published guidance from the Department of Labor states that the WARN Act does not apply to hypothetical sequestration-related layoffs by government contractors.
James Giddens and Louis Freeh, the two trustees assigned to the case, maintained that the WARN Act did not apply in this case, as liquidating companies are not subject to the same rules as traditional employers.