Visegrad Group

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Visegrad Group

An informal grouping consisting of the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia. Leaders meet to discuss common issues. The group administers a scholarship fund and a working group on energy policy. It was established in 1991 following the end of the Cold War.
References in periodicals archive ?
On his part, Hungarian Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade Peter Szijjarto has chosen to negotiate a joint position among the four Visegrad countries, including Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Poland, and Hungary, at least.
In addition to joining the Western-style democracies, one of the most distinct objectives of the member states of the Visegrad Group has been to strengthen mutual relations among the citizens of the Visegrad countries.
Out of this, some 135 billion Euro or almost 39% of the total has been allocated for the four Visegrad countries.
The Visegrad countries, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia, joined the EU in 2004.
Transparency International Hungary (2012), Corruption Risks in the Visegrad Countries, Visegrad Integrity System Study, Hungary, [http://www.
The Visegrad countries are interested in Ukraine's successful European integration, especially in signing the Association Agreement with the EU in Vilnius.
The paper is a part of the research project Diversity management, comparison, the best practices of Visegrad countries, Visegrad Fund, No 21110193.
However, the rapid disinflation has been aptly accompanied by sustained real growth in the Baltics only, while growth decelerated in the Visegrad countries and Croatia.
The Baltic and the Visegrad countries were able to make that transition very quickly and very effectively.
Three of the four Visegrad countries a with the exception of Poland a have sizable Roma populations that official estimates put at 1.
The initial clumsiness of cooperation reached its peak in 1997 when, after the EU Luxembourg Summit Estonia, together with Visegrad countries and Slovenia, was invited to start accession negotiations.
The region with the second highest collective score is Central and Eastern Europe, a category that includes the three Baltic states, the Visegrad countries, and the Balkans.