Employment at Will

(redirected from Violation of Public Policy)
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Employment at Will

A form of employment in which either the employee or the employer may terminate employment with or without cause and with or without notice. For example, an employee may quit as soon as he/she finds a better job. Likewise, the employer may fire an employee even if he/she comes to work on time and performs diligently. Employment at will is not allowed in all jurisdictions and it is restricted even where it exists. For example, an employer ordinarily may not fire a worker on racial or religious grounds.
References in periodicals archive ?
45) Arbitrariness ("Willkur") does not in itself constitute a violation of public policy.
162(f) and 165 and the violation of public policy doctrine raised in recent cases.
The new lawsuit, filed by Robert Nau of Los Angeles firm Alexander Nau Lawrence Frumes & Labowitz, claims damages of at least $5 million on causes of action for breach of contract, accounting and wrongful termination in violation of public policy.
On appeal, Schultz argued that allowing a more restrictive definition for purposes of UIM coverage was a violation of public policy and that the Illinois Insurance Code should be construed as requiring that any person who was insured for purposes of UM coverage also be insured for UIM coverage.
The California Court of Appeal has ruled that an employee who was fired after making a workplace violence complaint against a coworker may sue his employer for a violation of public policy.
62 (1903) (holding that where company uses policy language in violation of regulations, provision may still bind policyholder and insurer; remedy for insurer's violation of the law, assuming policy provision is not otherwise illegal, unconscionable, or in violation of public policy is regulatory fine rather than abrogation of provision at issue).
Congress, and therefore the IRS, has indeed possessed the authority to preclude deductions when the government perceived the payments as a violation of public policy.
He sued in state court, alleging violation of public policy and the California Unfair Competition Law.
Although a reasonable contractual limitation of a warehouseman's liability is valid, such a limitation does not preclude liability for fraud or a violation of public policy.
Because of this, the vast majority of states that do not have specific statutory schemes prohibiting adverse employment actions--including Indiana, Montana, and Pennsylvania-nonetheless allow claims for wrongful discharge in violation of public policy for similar underlying conduct.
They should reject these patents as violation of public policy.
A King County Superior Court jury awarded $500,000 for racial bias, $1 million for defamation and $506,375 for wrongful discharge in violation of public policy.