vicarious liability

(redirected from Vicariously liable)
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Contingent Liability

A liability that a company may have to pay, but only if a certain future event occurs. Usually, a contingent liability refers to the outcome of a lawsuit: that is, the company may have to pay a significant amount of money if it loses the lawsuit. Contingent liabilities are recorded under accounts payable; their existence may also affect the share price.

vicarious liability

see TORT.

vicarious liability

The legal principle that persons who are in a position to control the actions of another will be held liable for any injuries caused by that other person.Liability does not rely on proving there was improper training, instructions, control, or supervision. Rather, it is imposed merely because of the relationship between the parties.Respondeat superior is one type of vicarious liability. In real estate, the concept is most often encountered in claims against an employer (construction contractor, property manager, and sometimes even real estate brokers) for the discriminatory actions of an employee.

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6] The State is in the same position as private employers, and the State Liability Act provides that the State is vicariously liable for the wrongful acts or omissions of State employees.
In Courtland, the plaintiff sued the franchisee and franchisor, alleging that she was sexually harassed by one of her supervisors, a franchisee employee, and that BWWI should be held vicariously liable for those acts.
However, Labor Law [section] 240 (1)--which holds owners and general contractors absolutely liable for any breach of the statute even if "the job was performed by an independent contractor over which [they] exercised no supervision or control" (Rocovich, 78 NY2d at 513)--does not obviate the right of an owner or general contractor, who is only vicariously liable by statute, to seek "full indemnification from the party wholly responsible for the accident" (Kelly v Diesel Constr.
Because Mary is an employee, her boss is vicariously liable for her.
The court also found that GSU was not vicariously liable, even though it employed faculty and staff who did the copying that may have been illegal; GSU did not profit from the copying.
Under DIFC and QFC employment law, an employer may be held vicariously liable for the actions of its employees, for example bullying or harassing a colleague by comments made on Facebook or Twitter," the law firm said in a report.
Attending physicians are directly liable for their own negligence, as well as vicariously liable for residents' actions because of their supervisory role, although some authors have considered failure to supervise a form of direct rather than vicarious liability (JAMA 2004;292:1051-6).
Solicitor Carlton Rae said: "This judgment is clear it has set down that the church was vicariously liable and in breach of its duty of care.
The committee said the high court wrongly held that it was vicariously liable for the incident.
The Mitchells contended that Methodist was vicariously liable for the negligence of its nursing staff and that it was not necessary for the Mitchells' expert witness to detail the required standard of care for each of Methodists' employees for whom it was vicariously liable.
The bill would have authorized money damages for such actions to include economic damages, solatium, damages for pain and suffering, and punitive damages, and it would have made a foreign State vicariously liable for the actions of its officials, employees, or agents.
In a writ lodged at Perth Sheriff Court, Henvey alleges that the lorry driver's "fault and negligence mean the company are vicariously liable for causing the accident".